General Behavior Inventory

Aamir Ranjha

General Behavior Inventory

General Behavior Inventory

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About Scale Name

Scale Name

General Behavior Inventory

Author Details

Richard Depue and colleagues

Translation Availability

Not Sure

General Behavior Inventory
General Behavior Inventory

Background/Description

The General Behavior Inventory (GBI) is a 73-item self-report questionnaire that is used to assess manic and depressive symptoms in adults. It was developed by Richard Depue and colleagues in the early 1980s. The GBI has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure of mood symptoms, and it is widely used in research and clinical settings.

The GBI is divided into two subscales: the Manic Symptoms subscale and the Depressive Symptoms subscale. The Manic Symptoms subscale assesses symptoms such as increased energy, racing thoughts, and grandiose ideas. The Depressive Symptoms subscale assesses symptoms such as sadness, hopelessness, and fatigue.

The GBI is scored on a 4-point scale, with higher scores indicating more severe symptoms. A score of 1 indicates that the symptom is never or rarely present, a score of 2 indicates that the symptom is sometimes present, a score of 3 indicates that the symptom is often present, and a score of 4 indicates that the symptom is always or almost always present.

The GBI can be used to assess mood symptoms in adults of all ages. It is also a useful tool for tracking changes in mood symptoms over time. The GBI is a valuable resource for clinicians and researchers who are interested in understanding and treating mood disorders.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

The General Behavior Inventory (GBI) is a self-report questionnaire that assesses various dimensions of psychological well-being, including positive and negative affectivity, social potency, achievement striving, and alienation.

Here are the general steps for administering the GBI:

  • Provide participants with a copy of the GBI questionnaire.
  • Explain to participants the purpose of the questionnaire and the importance of answering each question honestly and to the best of their ability.
  • Instruct participants to read each item carefully and select the response that best describes how they have been feeling or behaving over the past few weeks or months.
  • Allow participants enough time to complete the questionnaire without feeling rushed or pressured.
  • Once participants have completed the questionnaire, collect the responses and score the results according to the scoring key provided in the GBI manual.
  • Interpret the results, taking into account the individual’s overall scores as well as their scores on each subscale.

Reliability and Validity

The GBI has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure of mood symptoms, and it is widely used in research and clinical settings.

The GBI has excellent internal consistency, with Cronbach’s alphas of .93 for the Manic Symptoms subscale and .94 for the Depressive Symptoms subscale. It also has good test-retest reliability, with correlations of .87 and .88 for the Manic Symptoms subscale and the Depressive Symptoms subscale, respectively.

The GBI has been shown to have good convergent validity with other measures of mood symptoms, such as the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. It also has good discriminant validity, meaning that it can distinguish between people with mood disorders and people without mood disorders.

The GBI is a valuable tool for clinicians and researchers who are interested in understanding and treating mood disorders. It is a reliable and valid measure of manic and depressive symptoms, and it can be used to assess mood symptoms in adults of all ages.

Available Versions

73-Items
10-Items
and more consult with below references

Reference

Depue, R. A., Slater, J. F., Wolfstetter-Kausch, H., Klein, D. N., Goplerud, E., & Farr, D. A. (1981). A behavioral paradigm for identifying persons at risk for bipolar depressive disorder: A conceptual framework and five validation studies. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 90, 381-437. https://doi.org/10.1037/0021-843X.90.5.381

Danielson, C. K., Youngstrom, E. A., Findling, R. L., & Calabrese, J. R. (2003). Discriminative validity of the General Behavior Inventory using youth report. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 31, 29-39.

Youngstrom, E. A., Findling, R. L., Danielson, C. K., & Calabrese, J. R. (2001). Discriminative validity of parent report of hypomanic and depressive symptoms on the General Behavior Inventory. Psychological Assessment, 13, 267-276.

Youngstrom, E. A., Joseph, M. F., & Greene, J. (2008). Comparing the psychometric properties of multiple teacher report instruments as predictors of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 64, 382-401. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jclp.20462

Meyers, O. I., & Youngstrom, E. A. (2008). A Parent General Behavior Inventory subscale to measure sleep disturbance in pediatric bipolar disorderJournal of Clinical Psychiatry, 69, 840-843. https://doi.org/ej07m03594

Youngstrom, E. A., Van Meter, A. R., Frazier, T. W., Youngstrom, J. K., & Findling, R. L. (2018). Developing and validating short forms of the Parent General Behavior Inventory Mania and Depression Scales for rating youth mood symptoms. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2018.1491006

Youngstrom, E. A., Perez Algorta, G., Youngstrom, J. K., Frazier, T. W., & Findling, R. L. (2020). Evaluating and Validating GBI Mania and Depression Short Forms for Self-Report of Mood Symptoms. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 1-17.

Youngstrom, E. A., Murray, G., Johnson, S. L., & Findling, R. L. (2013). The 7 Up 7 Down Inventory: A 14-item measure of manic and depressive tendencies carved from the General Behavior Inventory. Psychological Assessment, 25, 1377-1383. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0033975

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is the General Behavior Inventory (GBI)?
A: The General Behavior Inventory (GBI) is a self-report measure designed to assess behavioral and emotional dysregulation.

Q: What does the GBI assess?
A: The GBI assesses a range of behaviors including impulsivity, aggression, anxiety, depression, and other symptoms associated with mental health disorders.

Q: Who can take the GBI?
A: The GBI is intended for use with adults aged 17 years and older.

Q: How long does it take to complete the GBI?
A: The GBI consists of 73 items and typically takes around 10-15 minutes to complete.

Q: Is the GBI a diagnostic tool?
A: No, the GBI is not a diagnostic tool but rather a screening measure that can be used to identify symptoms associated with mental health disorders.

Q: How is the GBI scored?
A: The GBI is scored by summing the responses to each item to obtain a total score, which can then be interpreted based on established cutoff scores.

Q: Can the GBI be administered online?
A: Yes, the GBI can be administered online or in paper-and-pencil format.

Q: What are some potential uses for the GBI?
A: The GBI can be used for a variety of purposes including research, clinical assessment, and treatment planning. It may also be used in forensic settings to assess risk for violent behavior.

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I am a senior clinical psychologist with over 11years of experience in the field. I am the founder of Psychology Roots, a platform that provides solutions and support to learners and professionals in psychology. My goal is to help people understand and improve their mental health, and to empower them to live happier and healthier lives.

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