Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank (RISB)

by Psychology Roots
2.5K views
A+A-
Reset

Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank (RISB)

Here in this post, we are sharing the “Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank (RISB)”. You can read psychometric and Author information.  We have thousands of Scales and questionnaires in our collection (See Scales and Questionnaires). You can demand us any scale and questionnaires related to psychology through our community, and we will provide you with a short time. Keep visiting Psychology Roots.

About Scale Name

Scale Name

Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank (RISB)

Author Details

Julian B. Rotter

Translation Availability

Urdu

Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank (RISB)
Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank (RISB)

Background/Description

The Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank (RISB) is a projective psychological test developed by Julian B. Rotter in 1950. It is a self-report measure that consists of 40 incomplete sentences, each of which is one or two words long. The subject is asked to complete each sentence in any way they choose.

The RISB is used to assess an individual’s personality and socioemotional functioning. It can be used to screen for adjustment problems, to facilitate case conceptualization and diagnosis, and to monitor treatment. The test is also used in research to study personality development and psychopathology.

The RISB is scored by a trained clinician who analyzes the subject’s responses for themes, content, and style. The scores are then used to generate a personality profile that can be used to understand the individual’s strengths and weaknesses, coping mechanisms, and areas of potential growth.

The RISB is a well-validated test that has been used in research and clinical settings for over 50 years. It is a reliable and valid measure of personality and socioemotional functioning. The test is also relatively easy to administer and score, making it a valuable tool for mental health professionals.

The RISB is based on the assumption that people’s responses to incomplete sentences reflect their underlying thoughts, feelings, and attitudes. The incomplete sentences are designed to be ambiguous and open-ended, which allows the subject to project their own personal experiences and perspectives onto the test.

The RISB is divided into three main sections:

  • The Ideation Scale measures the subject’s cognitive style and thought processes.
  • The Affect Scale measures the subject’s emotional state and level of adjustment.
  • The Social Relationships Scale measures the subject’s interpersonal style and social functioning.

The RISB is a valuable tool for understanding an individual’s personality and socioemotional functioning. It is a reliable and valid test that can be used in research and clinical settings.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

The Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank (RISB) is a projective personality test that can be administered individually or in a group setting. The test is typically administered by a trained clinician or psychologist.

The RISB consists of 40 incomplete sentences, each of which is one or two words long. The subject is asked to complete each sentence in any way they choose. There are no right or wrong answers, and the subject is encouraged to be as honest and spontaneous as possible.

The RISB is typically administered in a quiet setting where the subject will not be interrupted. The clinician will read the incomplete sentences aloud, and the subject will write their responses in the blank spaces provided. The test should take approximately 20 minutes to complete.

After the test is complete, the clinician will score the responses using a standardized scoring system. The scores are then used to generate a personality profile that can be used to understand the individual’s strengths and weaknesses, coping mechanisms, and areas of potential growth.

Reliability and Validity

The Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank (RISB) is a well-validated test that has been used in research and clinical settings for over 50 years. It is a reliable and valid measure of personality and socioemotional functioning.

Reliability refers to the consistency of the test scores. The RISB has been shown to be reliable over time, with test-retest correlations ranging from 0.70 to 0.80. This means that if a person takes the RISB twice, their scores will be similar on both occasions.

Validity refers to the extent to which the test measures what it is supposed to measure. The RISB has been shown to be valid in a number of ways. For example, it has been shown to correlate with other measures of personality, such as the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). This suggests that the RISB is measuring the same constructs as other well-established personality tests.

The RISB has also been shown to be valid in terms of its ability to predict behavior. For example, one study found that the RISB was able to predict which college students were more likely to drop out. This suggests that the RISB can be used to identify individuals who may be at risk for certain problems.

Available Versions

40-Items

Reference

Rotter, J. B., Lah, M., & Rafferty, J. E. (1992). Manual for the Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank: College Form (2nd ed.). Psychological Corporation.

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the RISB?
A projective personality test that uses incomplete sentences to assess an individual’s personality and socioemotional functioning.

Who developed the RISB?
Julian B. Rotter

How long does the RISB take to administer?
Approximately 20 minutes

How many incomplete sentences are there on the RISB?
40

What are the three main sections of the RISB?
Ideation, Affect, Social Relationships

Is the RISB a reliable and valid test?
Yes, the RISB is a reliable and valid test.

Disclaimer

Please note that Psychology Roots does not have the right to grant permission for the use of any psychological scales or assessments listed on its website. To use any scale or assessment, you must obtain permission directly from the author or translator of the tool. Psychology Roots provides information about various tools and their administration procedures, but it is your responsibility to obtain proper permissions before using any scale or assessment. If you need further information about an author’s contact details, please submit a query to the Psychology Roots team.

Help Us Improve This Article

Have you discovered an inaccuracy? We put out great effort to give accurate and scientifically trustworthy information to our readers. Please notify us if you discover any typographical or grammatical errors.
Make a comment. We acknowledge and appreciate your efforts.

Share With Us

If you have any scale or any material related to psychology kindly share it with us at psychologyroots@gmail.com. We help others on behalf of you.

Follow

Related Posts

Leave a Comment

Adblock Detected

Please support us by disabling your AdBlocker extension from your browsers for our website.