Autism Parenting Stress Index

Aamir Ranjha

Updated on:

Autism Parenting Stress Index

Autism Parenting Stress Index

Here in this post, we are sharing the Autism Parenting Stress Index”. You can read psychometric and Author information.  We have thousands of Scales and questionnaires in our collection (See Scales and Questionnaires). You can demand us any scale and questionnaires related to psychology through our community, and we will provide you with a short time. Keep visiting Psychology Roots.

About Scale Name

Scale Name

Autism Parenting Stress Index

Author Details

Silva, L. M. T. and Schalock, M

Translation Availability

Not Sure

Autism Parenting Stress Index
Autism Parenting Stress Index

Background/Description

The APSI was developed as a measure of parenting stress specific to the core and co-morbid symptoms of autism. Research has shown that parents of children with autism experience high levels of stress, which can negatively impact their well-being and ability to provide effective care for their child. The APSI was designed to help identify areas where parents may need additional support with parenting skills and to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing parenting stress.

The APSI was developed through interviews with parents of children with autism and covers a range of issues that are commonly associated with parenting a child with autism, including social disability, difficult-to-manage behavior, and physical issues. The scale allows parents to rate each item based on how stressful it is, from “Not stressful” to “So stressful that sometimes we feel we cannot cope.” The APSI has been shown to have acceptable internal consistency and test-retest stability for parents of children with autism and other developmental disabilities.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

Administration: The APSI is a self-report measure completed by parents of children with autism. The scale consists of 57 items and takes approximately 20-30 minutes to complete. Items are rated on a 5-point Likert scale ranging from “Not stressful” to “So stressful that sometimes we feel we cannot cope.”

Scoring: The APSI has three subscales: core social disability, difficult-to-manage behavior, and physical issues. Scores for each subscale are obtained by summing the ratings for the corresponding items. Total scores can be obtained by summing the scores for all three subscales.

Interpretation: Higher scores on the APSI indicate greater levels of parenting stress. Clinicians and researchers can use the APSI to identify specific areas where parents may need additional support with parenting skills, and to assess the effectiveness of interventions aimed at reducing parenting stress.

It is important to note that the APSI is a screening tool and not a diagnostic tool. A high score on the APSI does not necessarily indicate the presence of a clinical diagnosis. Rather, it provides insight into the unique stressors that parents of children with autism face and can guide interventions aimed at reducing parenting stress and improving outcomes for both parents and children.

Reliability and Validity

The APSI has demonstrated good internal consistency and test-retest reliability in studies with parents of children with autism and other developmental disabilities. In one study, the APSI demonstrated high internal consistency with Cronbach’s alpha values of 0.94 for the total scale, 0.85 for the core social disability subscale, 0.84 for the difficult-to-manage behavior subscale, and 0.77 for the physical issues subscale. Test-retest reliability was also high, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from 0.85 to 0.91 for the subscales and total score.

The APSI has been shown to have good construct validity, as demonstrated by its ability to discriminate between parents of children with autism and parents of typically developing children. The scale also correlates with measures of general parenting stress, such as the Parenting Stress Index (PSI). Additionally, the APSI has been shown to be sensitive to change following interventions aimed at reducing parenting stress, providing further evidence of its validity.

Available Versions

13-Items
57-Items

Reference

Silva, L. M. T., & Schalock, M. (2012). Autism parenting stress index: Initial psychometric evidence. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42, 566-574.

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is the APSI?
A: The APSI is a self-report measure designed to assess parenting stress specific to core and co-morbid symptoms of autism.

Q: Who completes the APSI?
A: The APSI is completed by parents of children with autism.

Q: What does the APSI measure?
A: The APSI measures parenting stress related to core social disability, difficult-to-manage behavior, and physical issues associated with autism.

Q: How is the APSI scored?
A: Items on the APSI are rated on a 5-point Likert scale and subscale scores are obtained by summing the ratings for corresponding items. Total scores are obtained by summing subscale scores.

Q: What does a high score on the APSI indicate?
A: A high score on the APSI indicates greater levels of parenting stress.

Q: Is the APSI a diagnostic tool?
A: No, the APSI is a screening tool designed to provide insight into the unique stressors that parents of children with autism face and to guide interventions aimed at reducing parenting stress.

Q: Is the APSI reliable and valid?
A: Yes, the APSI has demonstrated good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, construct validity, and sensitivity to change following interventions aimed at reducing parenting stress.

Q: How long does it take to complete the APSI?
A: The APSI takes approximately 20-30 minutes to complete.

Q: Who can use the APSI?
A: The APSI can be used by clinicians and researchers who work with families of children with autism. It is not intended for use as a diagnostic tool.

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I am a senior clinical psychologist with over 11years of experience in the field. I am the founder of Psychology Roots, a platform that provides solutions and support to learners and professionals in psychology. My goal is to help people understand and improve their mental health, and to empower them to live happier and healthier lives.

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