The Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised Questionnaire

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The Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised Questionnaire

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About The Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised Questionnaire

Scale Name

The Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised Questionnaire

Author Details

R. Chris Fraley

Translation Availability

Not Sure

The Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised Questionnaire
The Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised Questionnaire

Background/Description

The Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised (ECR-R) Questionnaire is a 36-item self-report measure of adult attachment style. It was developed by R. Chris Fraley, Nathan G. Waller, and Kerry A. Brennan in 2000 and is a revised version of the original Experiences in Close Relationships (ECR) questionnaire by Brennan, Clark, and Shaver (1998).

The ECR-R measures individuals on two subscales of attachment:

Avoidance: This subscale measures the extent to which people feel uncomfortable with intimacy and closeness. Avoidant individuals tend to be independent and self-sufficient, and they may have difficulty trusting and relying on others.
Anxiety: This subscale measures the extent to which people fear rejection and abandonment. Anxious individuals tend to be very dependent on their partners and may need a lot of reassurance.
The ECR-R is a widely used measure of attachment style, and it has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure. It has been used in research to study a variety of topics, including the development of attachment styles, the impact of attachment styles on close relationships, and the relationship between attachment styles and mental health.

Background of attachment theory

Attachment theory is a theory of emotional development that was developed by John Bowlby and Mary Ainsworth in the mid-20th century. Bowlby argued that attachment is a fundamental human need, and that the quality of our early attachments can have a profound impact on our close relationships throughout life.

Ainsworth’s research identified three main attachment styles in children: secure, avoidant, and anxious. Children with secure attachments feel loved and supported by their caregivers, and they are able to trust and rely on others. Children with avoidant attachments feel uncomfortable with intimacy and closeness, and they may have difficulty trusting others. Children with anxious attachments are afraid of rejection and abandonment, and they may be very clingy or demanding.

Development of the ECR-R

The ECR-R was developed in response to the need for a reliable and valid measure of adult attachment style. Fraley and his colleagues re-analyzed a pool of 323 attachment questionnaire items from a former study, and they selected the 36 items that were most strongly associated with the two dimensions of attachment: anxiety and avoidance.

The ECR-R was then tested in a series of studies, and it was shown to be a reliable and valid measure of adult attachment style. The ECR-R is now one of the most widely used measures of adult attachment style, and it has been used in thousands of research studies.

Introduction of the ECR-R

The ECR-R is a self-report measure, which means that participants are asked to rate how much they agree or disagree with each item on a scale of 1 to 7. The total scores for each subscale are calculated, and higher scores indicate higher levels of avoidance or anxiety.

The ECR-R can be used by individuals to learn more about their own attachment style and how it may impact their close relationships. It can also be used by clinicians to assess attachment styles in their clients.

The ECR-R is a valuable tool for understanding adult attachment style and its impact on close relationships. It is a widely used and well-validated measure, and it has been used in thousands of research studies.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

To administer the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised (ECR-R) Questionnaire, you can follow these steps:

  • Provide the participant with a copy of the ECR-R Questionnaire and a pencil or pen.
  • Instruct the participant to read each item carefully and rate how much they agree or disagree with each item on a scale of 1 to 7, with 1 being “strongly disagree” and 7 being “strongly agree.”
  • Explain to the participant that there are no right or wrong answers, and that they should answer each item honestly and based on their own personal experiences.
  • Remind the participant that the questionnaire is about their general experiences in close relationships, not just about their current relationship.
  • Allow the participant enough time to complete the questionnaire without feeling rushed.

Reliability and Validity

The Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised (ECR-R) Questionnaire is a widely used and well-validated measure of adult attachment style. It has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure in a variety of studies.

Reliability refers to the consistency of a measure. A reliable measure will produce similar results when administered to the same people on different occasions.

The ECR-R has been shown to have high internal consistency, meaning that the items in each subscale are highly correlated with each other. The ECR-R has also been shown to have high test-retest reliability, meaning that people’s scores on the ECR-R tend to be stable over time.

Validity refers to the extent to which a measure measures what it is intended to measure. There are different types of validity, including content validity, convergent validity, and discriminant validity.

The ECR-R has been shown to have content validity, meaning that the items in the questionnaire are relevant to the concept of attachment style. The ECR-R has also been shown to have convergent validity, meaning that it is correlated with other measures of attachment style. Finally, the ECR-R has been shown to have discriminant validity, meaning that it is not correlated with measures of other constructs, such as personality traits.

Available Versions

36-Items

Reference

Fraley, R. C., Waller, N. G., & Brennan, K. A. (2000). An item-response theory analysis of self-report measures of adult attachment. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 78(3), 350-365.

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the ECR-R?
The ECR-R is a 36-item self-report measure of adult attachment style. It measures individuals on two subscales: avoidance and anxiety.

What is attachment style?
Attachment style is a way of describing how people approach and experience close relationships. It is developed in early childhood through interactions with caregivers, and it can have a lasting impact on how people form and maintain close relationships throughout their lives.

What does the ECR-R measure?
The ECR-R measures two dimensions of attachment style: avoidance and anxiety. Avoidance refers to the fear of intimacy and closeness. People with high avoidance scores tend to be independent and self-sufficient, and they may have difficulty trusting and relying on others. Anxiety refers to the fear of rejection and abandonment. People with high anxiety scores tend to be very dependent on their partners and may need a lot of reassurance.

Who can use the ECR-R?
The ECR-R can be used by individuals to learn more about their own attachment style and how it may impact their close relationships. It can also be used by clinicians to assess attachment styles in their clients.

How do I complete the ECR-R?
To complete the ECR-R, you are asked to read each item carefully and rate how much you agree or disagree with each item on a scale of 1 to 7, with 1 being “strongly disagree” and 7 being “strongly agree.” The total scores for each subscale (avoidance and anxiety) are calculated, and higher scores indicate higher levels of avoidance or anxiety.

How do I interpret my ECR-R scores?
There are no “right” or “wrong” answers on the ECR-R. However, your scores can give you some insight into your attachment style and how it may impact your close relationships. For example, if you have a high avoidance score, you may find it difficult to get close to others and may prefer to be independent. If you have a high anxiety score, you may worry about being rejected or abandoned by your partner and may need a lot of reassurance.

Is the ECR-R a reliable and valid measure?
Yes, the ECR-R is a reliable and valid measure of adult attachment style. It has been shown to be reliable in multiple studies, and it has been correlated with other measures of attachment style.

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