Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale

Aamir Ranjha

Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale

Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale

Here in this post, we are sharing the “Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale”. You can read psychometric and Author information.  We have thousands of Scales and questionnaires in our collection (See Scales and Questionnaires). You can demand us any scale and questionnaires related to psychology through our community, and we will provide you with a short time. Keep visiting Psychology Roots.

About Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale

Scale Name

Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale

Author Details

Vincent A. Wheeler and Gary W. Ladd

Translation Availability

Not Sure

Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale
Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale

Background/Description

Children’s social interactions with peers are crucial for their overall development. These interactions provide opportunities for children to learn how to form and maintain friendships, resolve conflicts, and express themselves appropriately. Children who have positive peer interactions are more likely to have good social-emotional skills, academic success, and positive mental health outcomes.

Self-efficacy, or one’s belief in their ability to succeed in a particular task or situation, plays a significant role in children’s social interactions. Children with high self-efficacy for peer interactions are more likely to initiate interactions with their peers, persist in the face of challenges, and seek help when needed. Conversely, children with low self-efficacy for peer interactions are more likely to withdraw from social situations, avoid conflict resolution, and experience anxiety and social isolation.

The Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale (CSPI) is a self-report measure designed to assess children’s perceptions of their ability to interact effectively with their peers. Developed in 1982 by Vincent A. Wheeler and Gary W. Ladd, the CSPI has been widely used in research on children’s social development.

The CSPI consists of 22 items that describe various social interaction situations, including conflict situations (e.g., dealing with teasing, resolving disagreements) and non-conflict situations (e.g., making friends, participating in group activities). Children are asked to rate how easy or hard it would be for them to handle each situation on a 4-point Likert scale, ranging from “EASY!” to “HARD!”.

The Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale yields two subscales:

  • Conflict: This subscale measures children’s self-efficacy in handling conflict situations with their peers.
  • Non-Conflict: This subscale measures children’s self-efficacy in interacting with their peers in non-conflict situations.

The Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale has demonstrated strong psychometric properties, including high internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity with other measures of children’s social competence and adjustment.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

  • Introduction: Introduce yourself and explain the purpose of the assessment. Assure the child that their responses will be kept confidential. Tell the child that the questionnaire is about their interactions with other kids.
  • Instructions: Read each item on the questionnaire aloud and clearly. Ask the child to listen carefully and think about how easy or hard it would be for them to handle the situation described in the item. Tell the child to rate their answer on the 4-point Likert scale: EASY!, Hard, easy!, HARD!. Encourage the child to answer all the questions.
  • Scoring: Each item on the CSPI is scored from 1 to 4, with 1 being “EASY!” and 4 being “HARD!”. The total score for each subscale (Conflict and Non-Conflict) is calculated by summing the scores for the items on that subscale. The total CSPI score is calculated by summing the scores for all 22 items.

Reliability and Validity

The Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale has demonstrated strong internal consistency reliability, indicating that the items on the scale measure a consistent construct. The Cronbach’s alpha for the total CSPI score has been reported to range from .82 to .89, and the Cronbach’s alpha for the subscales (Conflict and Non-Conflict) have been reported to range from .73 to .85.

The CSPI has also demonstrated test-retest reliability, indicating that the scale produces consistent scores over time. The test-retest correlation for the total CSPI score has been reported to be .78, and the test-retest correlations for the subscales (Conflict and Non-Conflict) have been reported to range from .68 to .76.

The Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale has demonstrated evidence of both concurrent and construct validity.

Concurrent Validity: The CSPI has been shown to correlate with other measures of children’s social competence and adjustment, such as the Piers-Harris Children’s Self-Concept Scale and the Teacher Rating Scale of Social Efficacy. These correlations provide evidence that the CSPI measures a construct that is related to other measures of children’s social skills.

Construct Validity: The Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale has been shown to discriminate between children with different levels of social competence. Children with higher social competence scores on the CSPI tend to also have higher scores on other measures of social competence and adjustment. Conversely, children with lower social competence scores on the CSPI tend to also have lower scores on other measures of social competence and adjustment.

Available Versions

22-Items

Reference

Wheeler, V. A., & Ladd, G. W. , “Assessment of children’s self-efficacy for social interactions with peers,” Developmental Psychology, Vol. 18, No. 6, 1982, pp. 795.

Blumenfeld, P. C., & Kinghorn, S. N. , “Situational influences on children’s persuasive behaviors,” In annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, 1978.

Asher, S. R., & Hymel, S. , “Children’s social competence in peer relations: Sociometric and behavioral assessment,” Social competence, 1981, pp. 125–157.

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is the Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale?
A: The CSPI is a self-report measure designed to assess children’s perceptions of their ability to interact effectively with their peers.

Q: Who developed the Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale?
A: The CSPI was developed by Vincent A. Wheeler and Gary W. Ladd in 1982.

Q: What are the subscales of the Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale?
A: The CSPI has two subscales: Conflict and Non-Conflict. The Conflict subscale measures children’s self-efficacy in handling conflict situations with their peers, while the Non-Conflict subscale measures children’s self-efficacy in interacting with their peers in non-conflict situations.

Q: How is the Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale scored?
A: Each item on the CSPI is scored from 1 to 4, with 1 being “EASY!” and 4 being “HARD!”. The total score for each subscale (Conflict and Non-Conflict) is calculated by summing the scores for the items on that subscale. The total CSPI score is calculated by summing the scores for all 22 items.

Q: How is the Children’s Self-Efficacy in Peer Interactions Scale interpreted?
A: Higher scores on the CSPI indicate higher self-efficacy in peer interactions. Lower scores on the CSPI indicate lower self-efficacy in peer interactions. Cut-off scores for indicating low, average, or high self-efficacy have not been established for the CSPI. However, the CSPI scores can be interpreted in light of the child’s individual circumstances and other measures of their social competence and adjustment.

Disclaimer

Please note that Psychology Roots does not have the right to grant permission for the use of any psychological scales or assessments listed on its website. To use any scale or assessment, you must obtain permission directly from the author or translator of the tool. Psychology Roots provides information about various tools and their administration procedures, but it is your responsibility to obtain proper permissions before using any scale or assessment. If you need further information about an author’s contact details, please submit a query to the Psychology Roots team.

Help Us Improve This Article

Have you discovered an inaccuracy? We put out great effort to give accurate and scientifically trustworthy information to our readers. Please notify us if you discover any typographical or grammatical errors.
Make a comment. We acknowledge and appreciate your efforts.

Share With Us

If you have any scale or any material related to psychology kindly share it with us at psychologyroots@gmail.com. We help others on behalf of you.

Follow

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Support through Sharing:

I am a senior clinical psychologist with over 11years of experience in the field. I am the founder of Psychology Roots, a platform that provides solutions and support to learners and professionals in psychology. My goal is to help people understand and improve their mental health, and to empower them to live happier and healthier lives.

Subscribe
Notify of
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments