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10 Anxious Behaviours may be Trauma Responses

Here in this post, we are discussing “10 Anxious Behaviours may be Trauma Responses”.  You can read more about psychology-related material on our website. Keep visiting Psychology Roots.
Every person exhibits odd habits and tendencies. They may look strange to us, but not to someone who isn’t familiar with our culture. Even while many of our actions are just human, they may also be a sign of anxiousness.
Anxiety is often characterised by symptoms such as anxiousness, dread of social situations, and aversion to large groups. Many types of anxiety, on the other hand, are less visible. For example, some individuals like being in a crowd, while others fear a one-on-one coffee date. Anxious habits, no matter how well-known they are, may be connected to some early trauma. Trauma has been linked to a wide range of symptoms of anxiety, including phobias, panic attacks, and a host of other mental health issues.
Fear of being perceived or assessed badly may appear in a variety of ways. Fear of being in a position where they can’t leave, such as having other people in their homes or safe places, may lead to a wide range of avoidance behaviours for survivors of childhood trauma. A person’s “trauma brain” tries to keep them away from anything that reminds them of a moment when they were unable to escape the pain.
Many various aspects of a person’s life are affected by these reactions. In my profession, I’ve found that these 10 nervous reactions are some of the most prevalent among those who have suffered trauma, even if they may be explained by other factors.

10 Anxious Behaviours may be Trauma Responses
10 Anxious Behaviours may be Trauma Responses

The practise of refusing to answer or avoiding phone calls.

There’s no stigma attached to this one among the millennials I hang out with, so it may seem apparent to others. It may appear like an easy chore to someone who does not suffer from social anxiety, and delaying answering the phone may be seen as laziness.
The adrenaline and cortisol rise that follows for someone with a trauma history sets it apart from ordinary lethargy or avoidance. When we get an unexpected phone call, we worry that it will lead to a dialogue in which we will be put on the spot, unlike when we just order takeout or check the shopping list with a spouse. This brings up memories of being caught, having our privacy or boundaries invaded by parents or caretakers, or being put in a position when there was no way out.

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Taking a backseat to others in social situations or group activities.

If you think this is blatant social anxiety, you’d be right. People with social anxiety may have been raised in environments where their nervous systems were continually out of whack, or where they were always required to be “on” and ready for a verbal fight.
The upshot is that adult survivors of trauma are sometimes overwhelmed in social situations. It might be difficult to take a mental break in situations when we are expected to present at a high level of participation. It’s not uncommon for people to “check out” of a situation by checking their phone or heading to the toilet alone. A huge crowd when we are not under any social pressure might actually make this experience more distressing for persons with social anxiety.

Feeling anxious or uneasy as a result of being seated too close to someone.

This is so prevalent that it has spawned a slew of internet memes. A movie theatre with no other people in it, or at least plenty of room between you and the next group, is a haven for many persons with social anxiety. As a result, anxious individuals may be unable to concentrate on the film because they are hyperaware of the fact that they are sitting next to an unknown person. People who have been subjected to abuse as children are more conscious of their surroundings and their position in a crowd or in a room. A huge personal bubble is thus necessary to sustain one’s own sense of security.

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Needing specific seating at restaurants or social occasions.

When confronted with a door or an open area, many trauma survivors choose to sit with their backs to a wall. This hypervigilance maintains their nervous system “ready” for any imagined danger, no matter how absurd it may seem. That apprehensive tension tends to dissipate, at least for a short while, when they are able to examine the room and the people in it.

Excessive eating or drinking.

Those who have been through a traumatic experience typically find strategies to cope by either overindulging in or abstaining from certain foods or drugs. Trauma and anxiety surrounding food and drink have been linked in recent decades by the health sector. “Adverse childhood events and trauma are common in the histories of people with eating disorders” (Jones, 2021). A person’s relationship with food and drugs is typically linked to their bad experiences or unmet needs in childhood even if their harmful habits of eating or substance use do not fulfil the criteria for the disease.

Someone unexpected and uninvitedly knocking on your door.

It was often said that there are two kinds of people: those who answer the door when someone knocks, and those who wait for the person to depart before they open it. All kidding aside, it wasn’t until I was in my 30s that I recognised that my response to an unexpected knock on the door was unique to me. Anxiety and paranoia are often linked with childhood memories of being unable to flee.

Constantly apologising, even when you (or anybody else) aren’t to blame.

We acquire a deep feeling of guilt when we are repeatedly scolded or made to believe that everything is our fault. Even if you’ve done nothing wrong, you’ll always feel the need to apologise excessively. Emotional abuse or neglect as a youngster is often to blame for this.

The ability to get startled easily.

Many people with chronically dysregulated neurological systems exhibit an exaggerated reaction to sounds or stimuli that others may overlook or dismiss. Childhood trauma and abuse are linked to an enhanced startle reaction, or a tendency to be “jumpy.”

Not wanting guests since you can’t control their departure.

Due to growing up in a family where boundaries were blurred and privacy was infringed, this might lead to feelings of inadequacy.

Becoming more at ease with certain individuals than others.

Many individuals have an apprehensive attitude about meeting new people because of their upbringing in a society where grownups aren’t always reliable sources of safety and trust. When we’ve been through trauma, we have a more acute sense of who we feel secure with.

Summary

Anxiety is often characterised by symptoms such as anxiousness, dread of social situations, and aversion to large groups. Trauma has been linked to a wide range of symptoms of anxiety, including phobias, panic attacks, and a host of other mental health issues. These 10 nervous reactions are some of the most prevalent among those who have suffered trauma. Adult survivors of trauma are sometimes overwhelmed in social situations. It’s not uncommon for people to “check out” of a situation by checking their phone or heading to the toilet alone.
A movie theatre with no other people in it, or at least plenty of room between you and the next group, is a haven for many. Trauma and anxiety surrounding food and drink have been linked in recent decades by the health sector. “Adverse childhood events and trauma are common in the histories of people with eating disorders” A person’s relationship with food and drugs is typically linked to their bad experiences or unmet needs in childhood.

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