Perceived Control of Internal States Scale

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Perceived Control of Internal States Scale

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About Scale Name

Scale Name

Perceived Control of Internal States Scale

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Author Details

The Perceived Control of Internal States Scale (PCISS) was developed by Dr. Shelley E. Taylor, a social psychologist and professor at the University of California, Los Angeles. The scale was first published in her book “Positive Illusions: Creative Self-Deception and the Healthy Mind” in 1989. Since then, the scale has been used in a variety of research studies in the field of psychology.

Translation Availability

The Perceived Control of Internal States Scale (PCISS) is available in multiple languages. The scale has been translated into several languages including Spanish, Chinese, German, and Italian.

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Urdu Translation

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Perceived Control of Internal States Scale
Perceived Control of Internal States Scale

Background/Description

The Perceived Control of Internal States Scale (PCISS) is a self-report measure that assesses an individual’s perceived control over their emotional and physiological states. It is designed to measure the extent to which an individual believes they can regulate their emotions, physiological states, and behaviors. The scale consists of 32 items that are rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale, with responses ranging from “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree.”

The PCISS was developed by Dr. Shelley E. Taylor, a social psychologist, and published in her book “Positive Illusions: Creative Self-Deception and the Healthy Mind” in 1989. The scale has been widely used in research on emotion regulation and stress, as well as in studies on health, well-being, and coping.

Research has shown that individuals who have a higher perceived control of their internal states are more likely to have better mental and physical health outcomes. Perceived control has been found to be positively related to well-being, while low perceived control has been associated with negative health outcomes, such as stress and anxiety.

It’s important to note that the PCISS is not a diagnostic tool, but rather a measure of a specific construct and it should be used in conjunction with other assessment tools to gain a comprehensive understanding of an individual’s psychological functioning.

Scoring

The Perceived Control of Internal States Scale (PCISS) is scored by summing the responses to the 32 items on the scale. Each item is rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale, with responses ranging from “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree.” Each item is scored from 1 to 5, with 1 indicating “strongly disagree” and 5 indicating “strongly agree.” The total score can range from 32 to 160, with higher scores indicating greater perceived control of internal states.

It’s also important to note that different authors may have different scoring methods and cut off points, and that researchers should consult the original source for more information on how to score and interpret the results of the scale.

Additionally, the scale has been found to have high internal consistency and test-retest reliability, meaning that the results of the scale are consistent over time and across different samples.

It’s also good to mention that the PCISS is a self-report measure, so the scoring results are based on the individual’s perception of their control over their internal states, which is not always accurate and may be affected by various factors such as social desirability bias.

Reliability and Validity

The Perceived Control of Internal States Scale (PCISS) has demonstrated high levels of reliability and validity in research studies.

Reliability is a measure of the consistency of the results obtained from a scale. The PCISS has been found to have high internal consistency, which means that the items on the scale are related to each other in a consistent manner. Additionally, the PCISS has also been found to have good test-retest reliability, which means that the results of the scale are consistent over time.

Validity is a measure of the extent to which a scale measures what it is intended to measure. The PCISS has been found to have good construct validity, which means that the scale is related to other measures of similar constructs, such as emotional regulation and stress. Additionally, the PCISS has been found to be positively related to well-being and negatively related to stress and anxiety, which supports its criterion-related validity.

It’s also important to note that while the PCISS has demonstrated high reliability and validity, it is not a diagnostic tool and should be used in conjunction with other assessment tools to gain a comprehensive understanding of an individual’s psychological functioning. Additionally, as with any measure, it is important to consider the cultural and contextual appropriateness when interpreting the results.

Available Versions

The Perceived Control of Internal States Scale (PCISS) was originally developed by Dr. Shelley E. Taylor in 1989 and published in her book “Positive Illusions: Creative Self-Deception and the Healthy Mind”. Since then, several versions of the scale have been developed and used in research studies. Here are a few examples of the available versions of the PCISS:

  1. The original version of the PCISS, developed by Dr. Shelley E. Taylor, includes 32 items that are rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale.
  2. A shortened version of the PCISS, known as the PCISS-12, was developed by Dr. Taylor and colleagues. This version includes 12 items that are rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale.
  3. Another version of the PCISS, known as the PCISS-Brief, was developed by Dr. Taylor and colleagues. This version includes 8 items that are rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale.
  4. Another version of the PCISS, known as the PCISS-Revised, was developed by Dr. Taylor and colleagues. This version includes 32 items that are rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale, but the items were revised to better reflect the concept of perceived control over internal states.

Reference

Taylor, S. E. (1989). Positive illusions: Creative self-deception and the healthy mind. Basic Books.

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