Interpersonal Solidarity Scale

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Interpersonal Solidarity Scale

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About Interpersonal Solidarity Scale

Scale Name

Interpersonal Solidarity Scale

Author Details

Larry R. Wheeless

Translation Availability

Not Sure

Interpersonal Solidarity Scale
Interpersonal Solidarity Scale

Background/Description

The Interpersonal Solidarity Scale (ISS) was developed by Larry R. Wheeless in 1976. Wheeless was interested in developing a measure of interpersonal solidarity because he believed that it was an important component of close relationships. He was also interested in examining how solidarity might be influenced by different factors, such as the length of a relationship, the type of relationship, and the level of communication between partners.

Wheeless began by developing a list of items that he believed were relevant to interpersonal solidarity. He then asked a group of people to rate these items on a scale of how important they were to them in their close relationships. Based on the results of this pilot study, Wheeless selected 20 items to include in the final version of the ISS.

The ISS is a self-report measure, meaning that it is designed to be completed by the individual themselves. The scale consists of 20 items, and respondents are asked to rate each item on a 7-point scale, from 1 (strongly disagree) to 7 (strongly agree). The total score on the ISS is calculated by summing the responses to all 20 items. Higher scores on the ISS indicate higher levels of interpersonal solidarity.

The ISS has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure of interpersonal solidarity. It has been used in a variety of research studies to examine the role of solidarity in different types of relationships, including romantic relationships, friendships, and family relationships. Research has shown that interpersonal solidarity is associated with a number of positive outcomes, such as relationship satisfaction, communication quality, and social support.

The ISS is a valuable tool for researchers and clinicians who are interested in studying or assessing interpersonal solidarity. It can be used to examine how solidarity changes over time, how it is influenced by different factors, and how it relates to other important relationship variables.

Researchers have used the ISS to examine how interpersonal solidarity is related to relationship satisfaction in married couples. They found that couples who reported higher levels of solidarity also reported higher levels of satisfaction in their relationships.
Researchers have also used the ISS to examine how interpersonal solidarity is related to communication quality in romantic relationships. They found that couples who reported higher levels of solidarity also exhibited more effective communication skills.
Clinicians have used the ISS to assess the level of interpersonal solidarity in couples who are seeking therapy. They use this information to develop interventions that can help couples to strengthen their relationships.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

  • Explain the purpose of the scale to the respondent. Let them know that the scale is designed to measure the degree of closeness and shared identity that they feel in their relationships with others.
  • Provide the respondent with a copy of the ISS. The ISS is a self-report measure, so the respondent will be able to complete it on their own.
  • Ask the respondent to read each item carefully and rate it on a 7-point scale, from 1 (strongly disagree) to 7 (strongly agree).
  • Once the respondent has completed the scale, collect it and score it. To score the ISS, simply sum the responses to all 20 items. Higher scores on the ISS indicate higher levels of interpersonal solidarity.

Reliability and Validity

The Interpersonal Solidarity Scale (ISS) is a reliable and valid measure of interpersonal solidarity. It has been used in a variety of research studies to examine the role of solidarity in different types of relationships, including romantic relationships, friendships, and family relationships. Research has shown that interpersonal solidarity is associated with a number of positive outcomes, such as relationship satisfaction, communication quality, and social support.

Reliability refers to the consistency of a measure over time and across different situations. The ISS has been shown to be highly reliable, with internal consistency coefficients (Cronbach’s alpha) typically above .90. This means that the items on the ISS are well-correlated with each other, suggesting that they are measuring the same underlying construct.

Validity refers to the extent to which a measure measures what it is intended to measure. The ISS has been shown to have good concurrent validity, meaning that it correlates with other measures of related constructs, such as trust, liking, and self-disclosure. For example, one study found that the ISS correlated positively with a measure of relational satisfaction in couples.

The ISS has also been shown to have good predictive validity, meaning that it can be used to predict future outcomes, such as relationship stability. For example, another study found that couples who reported higher levels of solidarity on the ISS were less likely to break up over time.

Available Versions

20-Items

Reference

Wheeless, L. R. (1976). Self-disclosure and interpersonal solidarity: Measurement, validation, and relationships. Human Communication Research, 3(1), 47–61. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2958.1976.tb00503.x

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Interpersonal Solidarity Scale?
The Interpersonal Solidarity Scale (ISS) is a 20-item self-report measure of the degree of closeness and shared identity that individuals feel in their relationships with others.

How is the ISS scored?
The ISS is scored by summing the responses to all 20 items. Higher scores on the ISS indicate higher levels of interpersonal solidarity.

What is the reliability and validity of the ISS?
The ISS is a reliable and valid measure of interpersonal solidarity. It has been shown to have high internal consistency and to correlate with other related constructs, such as trust, liking, and self-disclosure.

How can the ISS be used?
The ISS can be used in a variety of research and clinical settings. For example, researchers might use the ISS to examine the role of interpersonal solidarity in different types of relationships, such as romantic relationships, friendships, and family relationships. Clinicians might use the ISS to assess the level of interpersonal solidarity in couples who are seeking therapy.

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