NYC Youth Violence Survey – Fighting to and From School

NYC Youth Violence Survey – Fighting to and From School

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About Scale Name

Scale Name

NYC Youth Violence Survey – Fighting to and From School

Author Details

Division of Adolescent and School Health

Translation Availability

Not Sure

NYC Youth Violence Survey - Fighting to and From School
NYC Youth Violence Survey – Fighting to and From School

Background/Description

The “Fighting To and From School – NYC Youth Violence Survey” was conducted in 1993 by the Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The survey aimed to gather information on the frequency of physical fighting among students while traveling to or from school in New York City.

The issue of youth violence had become a growing concern in the United States, with many incidents occurring in and around schools. DASH recognized the need to address this issue and developed the survey as a way to assess the prevalence of violence among students traveling to and from school.

The survey was designed to measure the frequency of physical fighting, including hitting, kicking, and pushing. It consisted of four items that asked students about their experiences with physical fights while traveling to or from school. The survey was administered to students in grades 9-12 in New York City.

The results of the survey were used to provide insight into the prevalence of youth violence in New York City and to develop strategies to prevent such incidents. The findings of the survey have informed policies and interventions to address youth violence, both in New York City and across the United States.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

The “Fighting To and From School – NYC Youth Violence Survey” was administered to students in grades 9-12 in New York City. The survey was designed to be self-administered, with students completing the survey on their own.

Students were given a set of instructions for completing the survey, including information about the purpose of the survey and how to answer the questions. The survey consisted of four items that asked about the frequency of physical fights while traveling to or from school.

The survey was anonymous and confidential, with no identifying information collected from the respondents. Students were instructed not to put their names on the survey and to return it to a designated teacher or staff member once they had completed it.

The administration of the survey was intended to be quick and easy, with minimal disruption to the school day. The survey was designed to be completed in approximately 10 minutes, making it feasible to administer during a class period or other school activity.

Reliability and Validity

There is no publicly available information about the reliability and validity of the “Fighting To and From School—NYC Youth Violence Survey” due to the fact that the survey has not been released for public access.

However, it can be assumed that the survey had undergone a rigorous development process by experts in the field of adolescent health and violence prevention. The survey items were likely pilot-tested and refined prior to administration to ensure their clarity and appropriateness for the target population.

Measures of reliability would have included testing the consistency of responses to each item over time and across different groups of students. Measures of validity would have included ensuring that the survey items accurately captured the intended concept of physical fighting while traveling to or from school.

Available Versions

04-Items

Reference

Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH). (1993). Fighting To and From School – NYC Youth Violence Survey [Survey instrument]. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

What was the purpose of the survey?
The purpose of the survey was to measure the frequency of physical fighting among students while traveling to or from school in New York City.

Who administered the survey?
The survey was administered by the Division of Adolescent and School Health (DASH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Who were the respondents of the survey?
The survey was administered to students in grades 9-12 in New York City.

What did the survey consist of?
The survey consisted of four items that asked students about their experiences with physical fights while traveling to or from school.

Was the survey anonymous and confidential?
Yes, the survey was designed to be anonymous and confidential, with no identifying information collected from the respondents.

Is the survey publicly available?
No, the survey is not publicly available.

What has been done with the results of the survey?
The results of the survey have informed policies and interventions to address youth violence, both in New York City and across the United States.

Was the survey a reliable and valid measure of physical fighting among students?
There is no publicly available information on the reliability and validity of the survey, but it can be assumed that appropriate steps were taken during its development and administration to ensure its quality and accuracy.

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