Trauma Screening Questionnaire

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Trauma Screening Questionnaire

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About Trauma Screening Questionnaire

Scale Name

Trauma Screening Questionnaire

Author Details

Chris R. Brewin, Suzanna Rose, Bernice Andrews, John Green, Philip Tata, Chris McEvedy, Stuart Turner, Edna B. Foa

Translation Availability

Not Sure

Trauma Screening Questionnaire
Trauma Screening Questionnaire

Background/Description

Trauma screening questionnaires are used to identify individuals who may have experienced a traumatic event and who may be at risk for developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a mental health condition that can develop after a person experiences a traumatic event, such as a car accident, natural disaster, or war. Symptoms of PTSD can include flashbacks, nightmares, anxiety, and difficulty sleeping.

Trauma screening questionnaires are typically brief and easy to administer. They can be used in a variety of settings, such as primary care clinics, hospitals, and mental health clinics.

The Trauma Screening Questionnaire (TSQ) is one of the most widely used trauma screening questionnaires. It is a 10-item self-report questionnaire that assesses two of the main symptoms of PTSD: re-experiencing and arousal.

The TSQ was developed by a team of researchers led by Chris R. Brewin, a professor of clinical psychology at the University of Oxford. The TSQ was first published in 2002 in the journal The British Journal of Psychiatry.

The TSQ has been shown to be a valid and reliable screening tool for PTSD. It has been used in a variety of research studies and has been shown to be effective in identifying individuals who are at risk for developing PTSD.

The TSQ is a valuable tool for identifying individuals who may need further assessment and treatment for PTSD. Early identification and treatment of PTSD can improve outcomes and reduce the risk of long-term complications.

Trauma screening questionnaires have become increasingly important in recent years as awareness of the prevalence and impact of trauma has grown. Trauma is a common life experience, with an estimated 70% of adults in the United States experiencing at least one traumatic event in their lifetime.

Trauma can have a significant impact on a person’s physical and mental health. Exposure to trauma is a major risk factor for the development of a variety of mental health conditions, including PTSD, depression, and anxiety.

Trauma screening questionnaires can help to identify individuals who are at risk for developing mental health problems due to trauma. This can lead to early intervention and treatment, which can improve outcomes and reduce the risk of long-term complications.

The Trauma Screening Questionnaire (TSQ) is a brief, self-report questionnaire that is used to screen for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is one of the most widely used trauma screening questionnaires in the world.

The TSQ consists of 10 items that assess two of the main symptoms of PTSD: re-experiencing and arousal. Respondents are asked to indicate whether they have experienced each item at least twice in the past week.

If you answer “yes” to six or more of the items on the TSQ, it is recommended that you speak to a mental health professional to be assessed for PTSD.

The TSQ is a valuable tool for identifying individuals who may be at risk for PTSD. It is easy to administer and can be used in a variety of settings. If you are concerned that you may have PTSD, please speak to a mental health professional.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

To administer the TSQ, the administrator should:

  • Introduce the TSQ to the respondent and explain the purpose of the questionnaire.
  • Instruct the respondent to read each item on the questionnaire and answer “yes” or “no” to indicate whether they have experienced the item at least twice in the past week.
  • If the respondent has any questions about the TSQ, the administrator should answer them clearly and concisely.
  • After the respondent has completed the TSQ, the administrator should score the questionnaire.

Reliability and Validity

The Trauma Screening Questionnaire (TSQ) is a reliable and valid screening tool for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It has been tested in a variety of studies and has been shown to be effective in identifying individuals who are at risk for developing PTSD.

Reliability refers to the consistency of a measurement tool. A reliable measurement tool will produce similar results when administered to the same person at different times or by different people.

The TSQ has been shown to be a reliable measure of PTSD symptoms. In one study, the TSQ was administered to a group of participants on two separate occasions, two weeks apart. The results showed that the TSQ had a high internal consistency alpha (0.90), which indicates that the items on the questionnaire are highly correlated with each other.

Validity refers to the degree to which a measurement tool measures what it is intended to measure. A valid measurement tool will produce results that are consistent with other measures of the same concept.

The TSQ has been shown to have good concurrent validity with other measures of PTSD symptoms. In one study, the TSQ was administered to a group of participants along with the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), which is a gold standard diagnostic instrument for PTSD. The results showed that the TSQ was highly correlated with the CAPS (r = 0.80), which indicates that the two measures are assessing the same underlying construct.

Available Versions

10-Items

Reference

Brewin, C. R., Rose, S., Andrews, B., Green, J., Tata, P., McEvedy, C., … & Foa, E. B. (2002). Trauma Screening Questionnaire. Journal of Traumatic Stress.

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the TSQ?
The TSQ is a 10-item self-report questionnaire that is used to screen for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Who can use the TSQ?
The TSQ can be used by mental health professionals, non-mental health professionals who have been trained on how to administer the TSQ, and individuals who want to screen themselves for PTSD.

How is the TSQ administered?
The TSQ can be administered in a variety of settings, including primary care clinics, hospitals, mental health clinics, and community agencies. The respondent is asked to read each item on the questionnaire and answer “yes” or “no” to indicate whether they have experienced the item at least twice in the past week.

How is the TSQ scored?
The TSQ is scored by counting the number of items that the respondent answered “yes” to. If the respondent answered “yes” to six or more items, then they are considered to be at risk for PTSD.

Is the TSQ a diagnostic tool?
The TSQ is not a diagnostic tool. It is simply a screening tool that can be used to identify individuals who may be at risk for PTSD. If a respondent answers “yes” to six or more items on the TSQ, it is recommended that they be referred to a mental health professional for a full assessment for PTSD.

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