Trait Hope Scale

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Trait Hope Scale

Here in this post, we are sharing the Trait Hope Scale”. You can read psychometric and Author information.  We have thousands of Scales and questionnaires in our collection (See Scales and Questionnaires). You can demand us any scale and questionnaires related to psychology through our community, and we will provide you with a short time. Keep visiting Psychology Roots.

About Trait Hope Scale

Scale Name

The Trait Hope Scale

Author Details

Charles R. Snyder

Translation Availability

Not Sure

Trait Hope Scale
Trait Hope Scale

Background/Description

The Trait Hope Scale (THS) was developed in the early 1990s by Charles R. Snyder and his colleagues. It is a self-report questionnaire that measures a person’s overall level of hope. The THS is based on Snyder’s cognitive model of hope, which posits that hope is made up of two components: pathways and agency.

Pathways refers to the ability to generate multiple ways to achieve one’s goals.
Agency refers to the motivation to pursue one’s goals and the belief that one can achieve them.

The THS contains 12 items, half of which measure pathways and half of which measure agency. Participants are asked to rate each item on a scale of 1 to 8, with 1 being “Definitely False” and 8 being “Definitely True.” Higher scores on the THS indicate higher levels of hope.

The THS has been validated in numerous studies and has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure of trait hope. It has also been shown to be predictive of a variety of positive outcomes, including academic success, physical and mental health, and resilience in the face of adversity.

The THS is a widely used measure of hope in research and clinical practice. It can be used to assess a person’s level of hope and to identify individuals who may be at risk for hopelessness or depression. It can also be used to track changes in hope over time and to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to increase hope.

Snyder began developing the THS in the late 1980s. He was interested in developing a measure of hope that could be used in research and clinical practice. He wanted to create a measure that was reliable, valid, and easy to use.

Snyder and his colleagues developed the THS based on their own research on hope, as well as on the research of other psychologists. They also conducted pilot testing of the THS to ensure that it was easy to understand and that the items were relevant to a variety of people.

The THS was first published in 1991. It has since been used in thousands of research studies and has been translated into multiple languages. The THS is now one of the most widely used measures of hope in the world.

The THS is a valuable tool for researchers and clinicians. It can be used to better understand the nature of hope and to develop interventions to increase hope. The THS can also be used to assess a person’s level of hope and to track changes in hope over time.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

  • Provide participants with a copy of the THS and a pencil or pen.
  • Ask participants to read the instructions carefully.
  • Explain to participants that there are no right or wrong answers, and that they should answer each question honestly and to the best of their ability.
  • Ask participants to rate each item on a scale of 1 to 8, with 1 being “Definitely False” and 8 being “Definitely True.”
  • Once participants have completed the THS, collect the questionnaires and score them.

Reliability and Validity

The Trait Hope Scale (THS) has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure of hope in numerous studies.

Reliability refers to the consistency of a measure. A reliable measure will produce similar results over time and across different situations.

The THS has been shown to be reliable in a number of studies. For example, one study found that the test-retest reliability of the THS was 0.85, indicating that the scale is highly consistent over time. Another study found that the internal consistency of the THS was 0.88, indicating that the items on the scale are highly correlated with each other.

Validity refers to the accuracy of a measure. A valid measure will measure what it is intended to measure.

The THS has been shown to be valid in a number of ways. For example, one study found that the THS was correlated with other measures of hope, such as the Hope Index and the Life Orientation Test. Another study found that the THS was correlated with a number of positive outcomes, such as academic success, physical and mental health, and resilience in the face of adversity.

Available Versions

12-Items

Reference

Snyder, C. R., Harris, C., Anderson, J. R., Holleran, S. A., Irving, L. M., Sigmon, S. T., et al.(1991). The will and the ways: Development and validation of an individual-differences measure of hope. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 60, 570-585.

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the THS?
The THS is a 12-item self-report questionnaire that measures a person’s overall level of hope.

What does the THS measure?
The THS measures two components of hope: pathways and agency. Pathways refer to the ability to generate multiple ways to achieve one’s goals, and agency refers to the motivation to pursue one’s goals and the belief that one can achieve them.

How is the THS scored?
Each item on the THS is rated on a scale of 1 to 8, with 1 being “Definitely False” and 8 being “Definitely True.” Higher scores indicate higher levels of hope.

What do the THS scores mean?
There are no established norms for the THS, so it is difficult to interpret scores in terms of what is considered “high” or “low.” However, higher scores on the THS are generally associated with more positive outcomes, such as academic success, physical and mental health, and resilience in the face of adversity.

How is the THS used?
The THS can be used in research and clinical practice to assess a person’s level of hope and to track changes in hope over time. It can also be used to identify individuals who may be at risk for hopelessness or depression.

Is the THS reliable and valid?
Yes, the THS has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure of hope in numerous studies.

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