Subjective Happiness scale Urdu

Aamir Ranjha

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Subjective Happiness scale Urdu

Subjective Happiness scale Urdu

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About Subjective Happiness scale Urdu

Scale Name

Subjective Happiness scale Urdu

Author Details

Zubia Bano and Aisha Sitwat

Translation Availability

Not Sure

Subjective Happiness scale Urdu
Subjective Happiness scale Urdu

Background/Description

Happiness is a complex and multifaceted concept that has been studied by philosophers, psychologists, and scientists for centuries. While there is no single definition of happiness that is universally accepted, it is generally understood to be a state of well-being characterized by positive emotions, life satisfaction, and meaning.

The Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS) is a brief and widely used self-report measure of subjective happiness. It was developed by Sonja Lyubomirsky and David Lepper in 1999 and has been translated into over 30 languages. The SHS consists of four items that ask respondents to rate themselves on a 7-point scale. The items are designed to assess both global subjective happiness (e.g., “In general, I consider myself a very happy person”) and happiness relative to others (e.g., “Compared to most of my peers, I consider myself much happier”).

The SHS has been shown to have good psychometric properties, including high reliability and validity. It is a quick, easy, and inexpensive way to measure subjective happiness, and it has been used in a wide range of research studies.

The SHS is a valuable tool for researchers and practitioners who are interested in measuring subjective happiness. It is a reliable and valid measure that can be used to assess individual differences in happiness, track changes in happiness over time, and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to promote happiness.

Here are some of the specific uses of the SHS:

  • Research: The SHS has been used in a wide range of research studies to investigate the correlates and determinants of subjective happiness. For example, researchers have used the SHS to examine the relationship between happiness and personality, social relationships, health behaviors, and life circumstances.
  • Clinical practice: The SHS can be used to assess the baseline level of happiness of individuals who are seeking treatment for mental health problems. It can also be used to track changes in happiness over time in response to treatment.
  • Program evaluation: The SHS can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to promote happiness. For example, the SHS could be used to assess changes in happiness following a mindfulness-based intervention or a positive psychology intervention.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

Introduce the scale: Explain to the participants that the purpose of the questionnaire is to measure their overall happiness. Assure them that their responses will be kept confidential.

Provide instructions: Hand out the Urdu version of the SHS questionnaire. Read aloud the instructions for each item, ensuring that participants understand the meaning of each statement.

Ask participants to rate themselves: For each item, ask participants to circle the number that best corresponds to their level of agreement with the statement. The scale ranges from 1 to 7, with 1 indicating strong disagreement and 7 indicating strong agreement.

Reverse-code the fourth item: As the fourth item is worded in the negative, it needs to be reverse-coded before scoring. This means that the value for each response option should be reversed (e.g., 1 becomes 7, 2 becomes 6, and so on).

Calculate the total score: After completing all four items, add up the participant’s scores. The total score can range from 4 to 28, with higher scores indicating greater subjective happiness.

Interpret the score: The SHS has no established norms for the Urdu-speaking population. However, a general guideline is that scores above 20 indicate high subjective happiness, scores between 15 and 20 indicate moderate subjective happiness, and scores below 15 indicate low subjective happiness.

Reliability and Validity

The Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS) is a widely used measure of subjective well-being that has been shown to have good reliability and validity. Reliability refers to the consistency of a measure, while validity refers to its accuracy in measuring what it is intended to measure.

Reliability

The SHS has been shown to have high internal consistency reliability, which means that the items on the scale are highly correlated with each other. Cronbach’s alpha, a measure of internal consistency reliability, is typically above .80 for the SHS. This indicates that the scale is a reliable measure of subjective happiness.

The SHS has also been shown to have good test-retest reliability, which means that the scores on the scale are stable over time. Participants who take the SHS twice, with a few weeks or months in between, tend to get very similar scores. This further supports the reliability of the SHS.

Validity

The SHS has been shown to have good convergent, discriminant, and construct validity. Convergent validity refers to the correlation of the scale with other measures of subjective well-being. The SHS is positively correlated with other measures of happiness, such as the Life Satisfaction Inventory and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. This suggests that the SHS is measuring a similar construct to these other measures.

Discriminant validity refers to the lack of correlation of the scale with measures of other constructs. The SHS is not correlated with measures of negative emotions, such as depression and anxiety. This suggests that the SHS is measuring a distinct construct from these other measures.

Construct validity refers to the extent to which the scale measures what it is intended to measure. The SHS has been shown to be sensitive to changes in happiness that are associated with major life events, such as marriage, divorce, and the birth of a child. This suggests that the SHS is measuring a meaningful construct of subjective well-being.

Available Versions

04-Items

Reference

Bano, Z., & Sitwat, A. (2017). Psychological well-being, social support, and self-efficacy: A comparison of nonresident adolescents of religious and nonreligious schools. Pakistan Journal of Psychological Research, 371-392.

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is the Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS)?
A: The SHS is a brief self-report measure of subjective happiness. It consists of four items that ask respondents to rate themselves on a 7-point scale. The SHS is a quick, easy, and inexpensive way to measure subjective happiness, and it has been used in a wide range of research studies.

Q: How is the SHS scored?
A: To score the SHS, the responses to the fourth item are reverse-coded (so that 1 becomes 7, 2 becomes 6, and so on) and then the scores for all four items are averaged. The resulting score can range from 1 to 7, with higher scores indicating greater happiness.

Q: What are the psychometric properties of the SHS?
A: The SHS has been shown to have good psychometric properties, including high reliability and validity. Reliability refers to the consistency of a measure, while validity refers to its accuracy in measuring what it is intended to measure.

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I am a senior clinical psychologist with over 11years of experience in the field. I am the founder of Psychology Roots, a platform that provides solutions and support to learners and professionals in psychology. My goal is to help people understand and improve their mental health, and to empower them to live happier and healthier lives.

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fatima
fatima
2 years ago

Hey can you please share the name of translator?

fatima
fatima
2 years ago

Also please share any reference for this study in which this scale was translated. I need the translator’s name along with year in which the scale was developed. Thankyou