Penn State Worry Questionnaire

Aamir Ranjha

Updated on:

Penn State Worry Questionnaire

Penn State Worry Questionnaire

Here in this post, we are sharing the “Penn State Worry Questionnaire”. You can read psychometric and Author information.  We have thousands of Scales and questionnaires in our collection (See Scales and Questionnaires). You can demand us any scale and questionnaires related to psychology through our community, and we will provide you with a short time. Keep visiting Psychology Roots.

About Scale Name

Scale Name

Penn State Worry Questionnaire

Author Details

Thomas J. Meyer

Translation Availability

Not Sure

Penn State Worry Questionnaire
Penn State Worry Questionnaire

Background/Description

The Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) is a 16-item self-report scale designed to measure the trait of worry in adults. Worry is regarded as a dominant feature of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The scale measures the excessiveness, generality, and uncontrollable dimensions of worry. The PSWQ has been found to distinguish patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) from other anxiety disorders. This questionnaire can be used in clinical and non-clinical settings as a screening and diagnosis instrument.

The PSWQ was developed by a team of researchers led by Thomas J. Meyer, a psychologist at Penn State University. The other authors of the PSWQ are Mark L. Miller, Robert L. Metzger, and Thomas D. Borkovec. The PSWQ was first published in 1990 in the journal Behavior Research and Therapy.

The PSWQ has been translated into over 30 languages and has been used in research studies all over the world. The PSWQ is a reliable and valid measure of worry. It has been shown to be effective in distinguishing between people with GAD and people with other anxiety disorders. The PSWQ can also be used to track changes in worry over time.

The PSWQ is a self-report scale, which means that you answer the questions yourself. The questions ask you about how often you worry about different things, how much control you have over your worry, and how much your worry interferes with your life.

To score the PSWQ, you simply rate each item on a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 being “not at all typical of me” and 5 being “very typical of me.” Your total score is the sum of your ratings for all 16 items.

The PSWQ has a scoring key that converts your total score into a percentile rank. This percentile rank allows you to compare your score to the scores of other people in the same age group. For example, if your percentile rank is 85, this means that you scored higher than 85% of people in your age group.

The PSWQ is a reliable and valid measure of worry. It has been shown to be effective in distinguishing between people with GAD and people with other anxiety disorders. The PSWQ can also be used to track changes in worry over time.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

The Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) is a self-report scale that can be administered in a variety of settings, including clinical and non-clinical settings. The PSWQ can be administered by a therapist or counselor, or it can be self-administered.

To administer the PSWQ, you will need a copy of the questionnaire and a pencil. The questionnaire is 16 items long, and each item asks you to rate how typical a certain worry statement is of you on a scale of 1 to 5. A score of 1 indicates that the statement is “not at all typical of me,” while a score of 5 indicates that the statement is “very typical of me.”

Once you have completed the questionnaire, you can score it by adding up your ratings for all 16 items. Your total score will range from 16 to 80, with higher scores indicating higher levels of worry.

The PSWQ has a scoring key that converts your total score into a percentile rank. This percentile rank allows you to compare your score to the scores of other people in the same age group. For example, if your percentile rank is 85, this means that you scored higher than 85% of people in your age group.

Reliability and Validity

The Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ) is a reliable and valid measure of worry. Reliability refers to the consistency of the measure, while validity refers to the accuracy of the measure.

The PSWQ has been shown to have good internal reliability, meaning that the items on the scale are consistent with each other. The PSWQ also has good test-retest reliability, meaning that people who take the scale twice will get similar scores both times.

The PSWQ has also been shown to have good validity. The PSWQ has been shown to correlate with other measures of worry, such as the Generalised Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7). The PSWQ has also been shown to be able to distinguish between people with GAD and people with other anxiety disorders.

In one study, the PSWQ was able to correctly diagnose GAD with an accuracy of 86%. This means that if someone took the PSWQ and scored high, there was an 86% chance that they would actually have GAD.

Available Versions

16-Items

Reference

Meyer, T. J., Miller, M. L., Metzger, R. L., & Borkovec, T. D. (1990). Development and validation of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire. Behavior Research and Therapy, 28(6), 487-495. doi:10.1016/0005-7967(90)90135-6

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Penn State Worry Questionnaire?
A 16-item self-report scale that measures the trait of worry in adults.

What does the PSWQ measure?
The excessiveness, generality, and uncontrollable dimensions of worry.

Who developed the PSWQ?
Thomas J. Meyer, Mark L. Miller, Robert L. Metzger, and Thomas D. Borkovec.

How is the PSWQ scored?
The total score ranges from 16 to 80, with higher scores indicating higher levels of worry.

Disclaimer

Please note that Psychology Roots does not have the right to grant permission for the use of any psychological scales or assessments listed on its website. To use any scale or assessment, you must obtain permission directly from the author or translator of the tool. Psychology Roots provides information about various tools and their administration procedures, but it is your responsibility to obtain proper permissions before using any scale or assessment. If you need further information about an author’s contact details, please submit a query to the Psychology Roots team.

Help Us Improve This Article

Have you discovered an inaccuracy? We put out great effort to give accurate and scientifically trustworthy information to our readers. Please notify us if you discover any typographical or grammatical errors.
Make a comment. We acknowledge and appreciate your efforts.

Share With Us

If you have any scale or any material related to psychology kindly share it with us at psychologyroots@gmail.com. We help others on behalf of you.

Follow

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Support through Sharing:

I am a senior clinical psychologist with over 11years of experience in the field. I am the founder of Psychology Roots, a platform that provides solutions and support to learners and professionals in psychology. My goal is to help people understand and improve their mental health, and to empower them to live happier and healthier lives.

Subscribe
Notify of
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments