Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale

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Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale

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About Scale Name

Scale Name

Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale

Author Details

Lawrence Scahill, Michael A. Riddle, M.D., Margaret McSwiggin-Hardin, Ph.D., Susan I. Ort, Ph.D., Robert A. King, Ph.D., Wayne K. Goodman, M.D., David Cicchetti, Ph.D., and James F. Leckman, M.D

Translation Availability

14 translation(s)

Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale
Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale

Background/Description

The Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) is a 10-item scale used to assess the severity of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in children and adolescents aged 6-18 years. The scale was developed by a team of researchers led by Lawrence Scahill at the Yale Child Study Center in 1997.

The CY-BOCS is a semi-structured interview that is administered by a trained clinician. The interview takes about 30-45 minutes to complete. The CY-BOCS is used to assess the severity of OCD symptoms in children and adolescents aged 6-18 years. The scale is divided into two subscales: obsessions and compulsions. Each subscale has 5 items, and each item is scored on a 5-point scale, ranging from 0 (no symptoms) to 4 (extreme symptoms). The total score for the CY-BOCS ranges from 0 to 40, with higher scores indicating more severe OCD symptoms.

The CY-BOCS is a reliable and valid instrument for assessing OCD in children and adolescents. It has been shown to have good interrater reliability (i.e., different raters agree on the scores) and test-retest reliability (i.e., the scores are consistent over time). The CY-BOCS is also a valid instrument, meaning that it measures what it is supposed to measure. For example, studies have shown that the CY-BOCS scores are correlated with other measures of OCD severity, such as clinician-rated assessments and self-report questionnaires.

The CY-BOCS is used by clinicians to diagnose OCD and to monitor the severity of OCD symptoms over time. It can also be used to assess the effectiveness of treatment for OCD. The CY-BOCS is a valuable tool for helping children and adolescents with OCD get the treatment they need.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

Here are the steps involved in the administration of the CY-BOCS:

  • The clinician introduces the CY-BOCS to the child and explains that it is a way to talk about their OCD symptoms.
  • The clinician asks the child about their obsessions and compulsions. The clinician will ask the child to describe their obsessions in detail, including what they think about, how often they think about it, and how much it bothers them. The clinician will also ask the child to describe their compulsions in detail, including what they do, how often they do it, and how much it bothers them.
  • The clinician scores each item on the CY-BOCS based on the child’s responses.
  • The clinician calculates the total score for the CY-BOCS.

Reliability and Validity

The Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS) is a reliable and valid instrument for assessing obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in children and adolescents.

Reliability refers to the consistency of the scale. The CY-BOCS has been shown to have good interrater reliability, meaning that different raters agree on the scores. The CY-BOCS also has good test-retest reliability, meaning that the scores are consistent over time.

Validity refers to whether the scale measures what it is supposed to measure. The CY-BOCS has been shown to be valid in several ways. First, the CY-BOCS scores correlate with other measures of OCD severity, such as clinician-rated assessments and self-report questionnaires. Second, the CY-BOCS scores have been shown to change in response to treatment, such as medication and cognitive-behavioral therapy. Third, the CY-BOCS has been shown to be able to distinguish between children with OCD and children with other mental health conditions.

Available Versions

10-Items

Reference

Scahill, L., Riddle, M.A., McSwiggin-Hardin, M., Ort, S.I., King, R.A., Goodman, W.K., Cicchetti, D. & Leckman, J.F. (1997). Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale: reliability and validity. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry, 36(6):844-852.

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the CY-BOCS?
The CY-BOCS is a 10-item scale used to assess the severity of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in children and adolescents aged 6-18 years.

Who can administer the CY-BOCS?
The CY-BOCS can be administered by a trained clinician, such as a psychologist, psychiatrist, or therapist.

How long does it take to administer the CY-BOCS?
The CY-BOCS takes about 30-45 minutes to administer.

How is the CY-BOCS scored?
Each item on the CY-BOCS is scored on a 5-point scale, ranging from 0 (no symptoms) to 4 (extreme symptoms). The total score for the CY-BOCS ranges from 0 to 40, with higher scores indicating more severe OCD symptoms.

What are the different subscales of the CY-BOCS?
The CY-BOCS has two subscales: obsessions and compulsions. Each subscale has 5 items.

What are the uses of the CY-BOCS?
The CY-BOCS can be used to diagnose OCD, to monitor the severity of OCD symptoms over time, and to assess the effectiveness of treatment for OCD.

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