Academic Performance Rating Scale

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Academic Performance Rating Scale

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About Scale Name

Scale Name

Academic Performance Rating Scale

Author Details

George J. DuPaul, Mark D. Rapport, and Lucy M. Perriello

Translation Availability

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Academic Performance Rating Scale
Academic Performance Rating Scale

Background/Description

The Academic Performance Rating Scale (APRS) is a 19-item scale that was developed to reflect teachers’ perceptions of children’s academic performance and abilities in classroom settings. The APRS was developed in response to the growing concern about the academic achievement of children with disruptive behavior disorders. The APRS was designed to be a reliable and valid measure of academic performance that could be used to identify students with academic difficulties and to monitor the effectiveness of interventions.

The APRS consists of three subscales:

Academic Success – This subscale measures the child’s ability to achieve academic goals, such as completing assignments, mastering concepts, and keeping up with the class.
Impulse Control – This subscale measures the child’s ability to control their impulses and stay on task.
Academic Productivity – This subscale measures the child’s ability to work independently and efficiently.
To complete the APRS, teachers rate each item on a 5-point scale, from 1 (never or poor) to 5 (very often or excellent). The total score for the APRS is the sum of the ratings for all 19 items. Higher scores indicate better academic performance.

The APRS has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure of academic performance. It has been used in a variety of research studies to identify students with academic difficulties and to monitor the effectiveness of interventions. The APRS can also be used by teachers to track students’ academic progress over time.

The APRS is a useful tool for teachers, school psychologists, and other professionals who work with children who have academic difficulties. It can be used to identify students who need additional support, to monitor the effectiveness of interventions, and to track students’ academic progress over time.

Here is a brief background of the APRS:

  • The APRS was developed in 1991 by George J. DuPaul, Mark D. Rapport, and Lucy M. Perriello.
  • The APRS was published in the journal School Psychology Review.
  • The APRS is a 19-item scale that measures academic performance in three areas: Academic Success, Impulse Control, and Academic Productivity.
  • The APRS has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure of academic performance.
  • The APRS can be used to identify students with academic difficulties, to monitor the effectiveness of interventions, and to track students’ academic progress over time.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

To administer the APRS, the teacher will need to have a copy of the APRS rating form and a copy of the student’s most recent report card. The teacher will also need to be familiar with the APRS rating scale.

The teacher will first read the directions on the APRS rating form. The directions will explain how to rate each item on the scale. The teacher will then rate each item on the scale, based on their observations of the student in the classroom.

Once the teacher has rated all of the items on the scale, they will add up the ratings for each subscale. The total score for each subscale will be between 1 and 9. The higher the score, the better the student’s performance in that area.

The teacher will then write a brief narrative summary of the student’s academic performance. The narrative summary should include the following information:

  • The student’s overall academic performance
  • The student’s strengths and weaknesses in each area of academic performance

Any specific concerns that the teacher has about the student’s academic performance
The teacher will then sign the APRS rating form and return it to the school psychologist or other trained professional.

Here are some additional tips for administering the APRS:

  • Make sure that the teacher is familiar with the APRS rating scale before they begin rating the student.
  • If the teacher is rating the student for the first time, they may want to observe the student in the classroom for a few days before they begin rating the student.
  • If the teacher has any questions about how to rate an item on the scale, they should refer to the APRS rating scale directions.
  • The teacher should write a brief narrative summary of the student’s academic performance. The narrative summary should be specific and should address the student’s strengths and weaknesses in each area of academic performance.

Reliability and Validity

The Academic Performance Rating Scale (APRS) has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure of academic performance.

Reliability is the extent to which a measure gives consistent results over time. The APRS has been shown to be reliable in a number of studies. In one study, the APRS had a test-retest reliability coefficient of 0.90. This means that the APRS scores were very similar when the scale was administered to the same students two weeks apart.

In another study, the APRS had a split-half reliability coefficient of 0.85. This means that the two halves of the APRS were very similar in terms of the scores they produced.

Validity is the extent to which a measure measures what it is supposed to measure. The APRS has been shown to be valid in a number of studies. In one study, the APRS scores were found to be correlated with teachers’ ratings of students’ academic performance on report cards. This suggests that the APRS is measuring the same thing as teachers’ ratings of academic performance.

In another study, the APRS scores were found to be correlated with students’ scores on standardized achievement tests. This suggests that the APRS is measuring a construct that is similar to what is measured by standardized achievement tests.

Available Versions

19-Items

Reference

DuPaul, G. J., Rapport, M. D., & Perriello, L. M. (1991). Teacher ratings of academic skills: The development of the Academic Performance Rating Scale. School Psychology Review, 20(2), 284-300.

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the APRS?
It is a 19-item scale that measures academic performance in three areas: Academic Success, Impulse Control, and Academic Productivity.

How is the APRS scored?
The APRS is scored on a 5-point scale, from 1 (never or poor) to 5 (very often or excellent). The total score for the APRS is the sum of the ratings for all 19 items. Higher scores indicate better academic performance.

Who can use the APRS?
The APRS can be used by teachers, school psychologists, and other professionals who work with children who have academic difficulties.

What are the strengths of the APRS?
The APRS is a reliable and valid measure of academic performance. It is easy to use and can be completed by teachers in a short amount of time. It is a comprehensive measure of academic performance, assessing both academic skills and behavioral factors. It can be used to identify students who need additional support, to monitor the effectiveness of interventions, and to track students’ academic progress over time.

What are the limitations of the APRS?
The APRS is a teacher-report measure, which means that it is based on the teacher’s perception of the child’s academic performance. This can be subjective and may not always be accurate. The APRS does not measure all aspects of academic performance. For example, it does not assess the child’s creativity or problem-solving skills. The APRS is a static measure, which means that it only provides a snapshot of the child’s academic performance at one point in time. It cannot be used to track changes in academic performance over time.

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