Personal and Relationships Profile

Aamir Ranjha

Personal and Relationships Profile

Personal and Relationships Profile

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About Personal and Relationships Profile

Scale Name

Personal and Relationships Profile

Author Details

Murray A. Straus, Sherry L. Hamby, Sue Boney-McCoy, and David Sugarman
(murray.straus@unh.edu)

Translation Availability

Not Sure

Personal and Relationships Profile
Personal and Relationships Profile

Background/Description

Domestic violence is a serious public health problem that affects millions of people around the world. It is estimated that one in four women and one in seven men have experienced severe physical violence by an intimate partner at some point in their lifetime. Domestic violence can have a devastating impact on victims, their children, and their families. It can lead to physical and emotional injuries, mental health problems, and even death.

In the 1970s, researchers began to develop assessment tools to identify individuals at risk of domestic violence. One of the first such tools was the Conflict Tactics Scales (CTS), which was developed by Murray A. Straus in 1979. The CTS was a self-report questionnaire that asked respondents to report on the frequency of various types of violent and nonviolent behaviors in their relationships.

The CTS was a valuable tool for research, but it was not without its limitations. For example, the CTS did not measure individual personality characteristics or relationship dynamics. As a result, researchers began to develop more comprehensive assessment tools, such as the PRP.

The Personal and Relationships Profile was developed in the 1990s by Murray A. Straus, Sherry L. Hamby, Sue Boney-McCoy, and David Sugarman. The PRP is a self-report questionnaire that assesses individual personality characteristics and relationship dynamics. It is commonly used in research and clinical settings to identify potential risk factors for family violence and to guide treatment planning.

The PRP consists of 10 main scales, each of which measures a different aspect of personality or relationships. The scales are as follows:

  • Dominance: This scale measures the tendency to assert one’s will over others.
  • Possessiveness: This scale measures the tendency to be jealous or controlling of one’s partner.
  • Anger: This scale measures the tendency to experience and express anger.
  • Impulsive/Rule-Breaking: This scale measures the tendency to act impulsively or to disregard rules.
  • Deceit: This scale measures the tendency to lie or deceive others.
  • Mistreatment of Others: This scale measures the tendency to mistreat others, either physically or emotionally.
  • Antisocial Personality Traits: This scale measures the presence of traits associated with antisocial personality disorder.
  • Empathy: This scale measures the ability to understand and share the feelings of others.
  • Communication Problems: This scale measures the tendency to have problems communicating with others.
  • Relationship Satisfaction: This scale measures the overall satisfaction with one’s current relationship.

The Personal and Relationships Profile can be administered to individuals or couples. The scoring of the PRP is based on a 4-point Likert scale, ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly agree). Higher scores on the Dominance, Possessiveness, Anger, Impulsive/Rule-Breaking, Deceit, Mistreatment of Others, and Antisocial Personality Traits scales are indicative of potential risk factors for family violence. Higher scores on the Empathy and Communication Problems scales are indicative of potential problems in relationships. Lower scores on the Relationship Satisfaction scale are indicative of dissatisfaction with one’s current relationship.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

Obtain informed consent: Before administering the PRP, the administrator must obtain informed consent from the individual or couple. This involves providing the individual or couple with information about the PRP, including the purpose of the assessment, the types of questions that will be asked, and the confidentiality of their responses.

Instruct the individual or couple: Once informed consent has been obtained, the administrator should instruct the individual or couple on how to complete the PRP. This includes explaining the purpose of each scale, how to answer the questions, and how to mark their responses.

Administer the PRP: The PRP can be administered in a paper-and-pencil format or electronically. The administrator should allow the individual or couple sufficient time to complete the PRP.

Score the PRP: Once the PRP has been completed, the administrator should score the questionnaire. The scoring of the PRP is based on a 4-point Likert scale, ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly agree).

Interpret the results: The administrator should interpret the results of the PRP in the context of other information, such as clinical interviews and behavioral observations. The administrator should discuss the results with the individual or couple and make recommendations for further assessment or treatment.

Reliability and Validity

The Personal and Relationships Profile (PRP) is a self-report questionnaire that assesses individual personality characteristics and relationship dynamics. It is commonly used in research and clinical settings to identify potential risk factors for family violence and to guide treatment planning. The PRP has been shown to have good reliability and validity.

Reliability refers to the consistency of a measure over time or across different observers. The PRP has been shown to have good internal consistency, which means that the different scales of the PRP measure the same construct consistently. The PRP has also been shown to have good test-retest reliability, which means that the PRP scores of individuals remain relatively stable over time.

Validity refers to the extent to which a measure measures what it is intended to measure. The PRP has been shown to have good construct validity, which means that it measures the constructs that it is intended to measure, such as dominance, possessiveness, anger, and relationship satisfaction. The PRP has also been shown to have good criterion validity, which means that it is correlated with other measures of the same constructs.

Available Versions

187-Items (General Version, Student Version)

Reference

Straus, M. A., Hamby, S. L., Boney-McCoy, S., & Sugarman, D. (1999). Manual for the personal and relationships profile (PRP). Durham, NH: University of New Hampshire, Family Research Laboratory. Available in: http://pubpages. unh. edu/~ mas2.

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Personal and Relationships Profile?
The PRP is a self-report questionnaire that assesses individual personality characteristics and relationship dynamics. It is commonly used in research and clinical settings to identify potential risk factors for family violence and to guide treatment planning.

What are the main scales of the Personal and Relationships Profile?
The PRP consists of 10 main scales, each of which measures a different aspect of personality or relationships. The scales are as follows:

  • Dominance
  • Possessiveness
  • Anger
  • Impulsive/Rule-Breaking
  • Deceit
  • Mistreatment of Others
  • Antisocial Personality Traits
  • Empathy
  • Communication Problems
  • Relationship Satisfaction

How is the Personal and Relationships Profile scored?
The scoring of the PRP is based on a 4-point Likert scale, ranging from 1 (strongly disagree) to 4 (strongly agree). Higher scores on the Dominance, Possessiveness, Anger, Impulsive/Rule-Breaking, Deceit, Mistreatment of Others, and Antisocial Personality Traits scales are indicative of potential risk factors for family violence. Higher scores on the Empathy and Communication Problems scales are indicative of potential problems in relationships. Lower scores on the Relationship Satisfaction scale are indicative of dissatisfaction with one’s current relationship.

What are the limitations of the Personal and Relationships Profile?
The PRP is a self-report measure, which means that it relies on the honesty and accuracy of the individual completing the questionnaire. The PRP is not a diagnostic tool. It cannot be used to diagnose mental health disorders. The PRP should be interpreted in the context of other information, such as clinical interviews and behavioral observations.

What are some additional resources on the Personal and Relationships Profile?

  • Straus, M. A., Hamby, S. L., Boney-McCoy, S., & Sugarman, D. (1999). The Personal and Relationships Profile (PRP): A self-report measure of family violence. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 25(3), 349-362.
  • Haggerty, K., Gold, S. A., Fremstad, M. B., & Hughes, H. M. (2004). The Personal and Relationships Profile (PRP): Reliability and validity in a college sample. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 19(12), 1543-1556.
  • Bornstein, M. H., Leeder, J. R., & Zambarano, R. (2002). The Personal and Relationships Profile (PRP) as a predictor of intimate partner violence. Journal of Family Violence, 17(3), 153-165.

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I am a senior clinical psychologist with over 11years of experience in the field. I am the founder of Psychology Roots, a platform that provides solutions and support to learners and professionals in psychology. My goal is to help people understand and improve their mental health, and to empower them to live happier and healthier lives.

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