Perceived Partner Responsiveness Scale

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Perceived Partner Responsiveness Scale

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About Scale Name

Scale Name

Perceived Partner Responsiveness Scale

Author Details

Perceived Partner Responsiveness Scale (PPRS) was developed by Harry T. Reis and Susan Sprecher in 2006

Translation Availability

The Perceived Partner Responsiveness Scale (PPRS) developed by Harry T. Reis and Susan Sprecher in 2006, is available in multiple languages, though the availability might vary. Researchers have translated and adapted the scale to different languages such as Spanish, Chinese, German, Greek, Turkish, and more.

Urdu Translation

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Perceived Partner Responsiveness Scale
Perceived Partner Responsiveness Scale

Background/Description

The Perceived Partner Responsiveness Scale (PPRS) is a measure used to assess how responsive an individual perceives their romantic partner to be in their relationship. The scale was developed by Harry T. Reis and Susan Sprecher in 2006, and it was first published in the journal “Personal Relationships”.
The PPRS is a self-report measure that assesses the degree to which individuals feel that their partners are responsive to their needs and concerns in the relationship. The scale typically includes items that assess how understanding, caring, and supportive a partner is perceived to be. The items are rated on a Likert scale, with responses ranging from “not at all” to “extremely.”

The PPRS is often used in research on romantic relationships to assess factors that may be related to relationship satisfaction and well-being. It has been used in studies investigating the link between perceived partner responsiveness and relationship outcomes such as satisfaction, commitment, trust, and emotional closeness. The PPRS has been found to be a reliable and valid measure, with good internal consistency and stability over time. It’s important to note that the PPRS is a multidimensional measure and the different dimensions that are assessed within the scale can be further studied in research.

Scoring

The PPRS is a self-report measure and typically includes items that are rated on a Likert scale, with responses ranging from “not at all” to “extremely.” The scale is scored by summing the individual item scores, with higher scores indicating a higher perceived level of partner responsiveness. Depending on the specific version of the scale, it can have a total score or multiple sub-scores for each dimension of responsiveness.

The PPRS can be administered in various ways, such as paper-and-pencil, online, or verbally. The administration method will depend on the research design and the population being studied.

The PPRS results are interpreted by comparing the score of an individual to the mean score of a normative sample or a sample with similar characteristics. A higher score on the PPRS indicates a higher perceived level of partner responsiveness, which is generally associated with greater relationship satisfaction, trust, and emotional closeness. A lower score on the PPRS indicates a lower perceived level of partner responsiveness, which may be associated with lower relationship satisfaction, trust, and emotional closeness. However, it’s important to consider the context and the specific research question being studied.

It’s also important to note that the PPRS is a multidimensional measure and the different dimensions that are assessed within the scale can be further studied in research. For example, researchers may focus on the specific dimension of understanding, caring or supportive and study their relation with other aspects of the relationship.

Reliability and Validity

Reliability refers to the consistency of a measure over time and across different samples. The PPRS has been found to have good internal consistency, meaning that the items on the scale are related to each other and measure the same construct. The PPRS has also been found to have good test-retest reliability, meaning that scores on the scale are consistent over time. These findings suggest that the PPRS is a reliable measure of perceived partner responsiveness.

Validity refers to the extent to which a measure accurately assesses what it is supposed to assess. The PPRS has been found to have good criterion-related validity, which means that scores on the scale are related to other measures of relationship outcomes such as satisfaction, commitment, trust, and emotional closeness. The PPRS has also been found to have construct validity, which means that it is related to other theoretically related variables such as communication and conflict. These findings suggest that the PPRS is a valid measure of perceived partner responsiveness.

It is important to note that the reliability and validity of the PPRS may vary depending on the specific version of the scale, the population being studied, and the research design. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to report the reliability and validity of the scale in their studies and to consider these characteristics when interpreting their results.

Available Versions

The original version of the PPRS developed by Reis and Sprecher in 2006, which includes a total of 12 items that assess the degree to which individuals feel that their partners are responsive to their needs and concerns in the relationship.

Reference

Reis, H. T., & Sprecher, S. (2006). Social psychological perspectives on successful romantic relationships. In S. Sprecher, A. Wenzel, & J. Harvey (Eds.), Handbook of relationship initiation (pp. 31-48). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

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