Surface Warfare Officer Human Factors Attitudes Questionnaire

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Surface Warfare Officer Human Factors Attitudes Questionnaire

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About Scale Name

Scale Name

Surface Warfare Officer Human Factors Attitudes Questionnaire

Author Details

O’Connor, Paul

Translation Availability

not sure

Surface Warfare Officer Human Factors Attitudes Questionnaire
Surface Warfare Officer Human Factors Attitudes Questionnaire

Background/Description

O’Connor developed the Surface Warfare Officer Human Factors Attitudes Questionnaire to assess the attitudes of U.S. Navy Surface Warfare Officers towards human factors that have been identified as causal to mishaps in high-risk work environments. The questionnaire was assessed for internal reliability using Cronbach’s Alpha, and nine items were dropped from the original questionnaire to increase Alpha levels.

However, the decision-making factor had negative Alpha scores and dropping items did not improve it. The Naval Aviator Human Factors (NAHF) questionnaire was adapted for SWOs, resulting in a 22-item questionnaire with four proposed factors: My Stress, The Stress of Others, Communication, and Command Responsibility. During the confirmatory factor analysis, four items were discarded.

Scoring, Administration and Interpretation

N/A

Reliability and Validity

After administering the Surface Warfare Officer Human Factors Attitudes Questionnaire to a sample of U.S. Navy surface warfare officers, a confirmatory factor analysis was conducted to identify the underlying factors that best explain the attitudes towards human factors. The analysis revealed a four-factor model that was found to be an appropriate fit for the data collected.

It is noteworthy that the four-factor model identified in this study was similar to the model derived from a sample of Naval Aviators, suggesting that these factors may be important across different domains within the military.

The four factors identified by the analysis were My Stress, The Stress of Others, Communication, and Command Responsibility. These factors represent different aspects of human factors that are relevant to the safe and effective operation of ships in high-risk environments.

By identifying the key factors that contribute to human performance in these contexts, the SWO HFAQ can be used to inform the development of training programs that enhance the human factors skills of surface warfare officers, ultimately improving safety and mission effectiveness.

Available Versions

38-Items

Reference

O’Connor, P. (2011). “An evaluation of the effectiveness of bridge resource management training”. International Journal of Aviation Psychology, 21(4), 357-374.

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