Differential Loneliness Scale – Short Student version

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Differential Loneliness Scale – Short Student version

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About Scale Name

Scale Name

Differential Loneliness Scale – Short Student version

Author Details

Norbert Schmidt and Verena Sermat

Translation Availability

Not Sure

Differential Loneliness Scale - Short Student version
Differential Loneliness Scale – Short Student version

Background/Description

Loneliness is a common experience among students, and it can have a significant impact on their well-being. Students who experience loneliness are more likely to report symptoms of depression, anxiety, and sleep problems. They are also more likely to have lower academic achievement and to drop out of school.

The Differential Loneliness Scale – short student version (DLS-SSV) is a self-report scale that was developed to measure loneliness in four different areas: romantic/sexual relationships, friendships, family relationships, and relationships with the community. The DLS-SSV was developed as a shorter version of the original Differential Loneliness Scale (DLS), which is a 60-item scale.

The DLS-SSV is a valuable tool for researchers and clinicians who are interested in assessing and addressing loneliness in students. It can be used to identify students who are experiencing loneliness in different areas of their lives, and to track changes in loneliness over time. The DLS-SSV can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce loneliness in students.

Here are some examples of how the DLS-SSV can be used:

  • A school counselor could use the DLS-SSV to identify students who are at risk for loneliness, and to provide them with support and resources.
  • A researcher could use the DLS-SSV to investigate the factors that contribute to loneliness in students, such as social anxiety, bullying, and academic stress.
  • A program developer could use the DLS-SSV to evaluate the effectiveness of a new intervention designed to reduce loneliness in students.

The DLS-SSV is a reliable and valid measure of loneliness in students, and it is easy to administer and score. It is a valuable tool for anyone who is interested in understanding and addressing loneliness in this population.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

To administer the Differential Loneliness Scale – short student version (DLS-SSV), simply provide the scale to the student and ask them to read and follow the instructions. The student should indicate for each statement whether it is true or false as it applies to them. Items with an asterisk (*) are reverse-scored, meaning that students receive one point for each false response to these items.

Once the student has completed the scale, you can score it by adding up the number of points for each item. The higher the total score, the higher the level of loneliness. A score of 10 or higher on any of the four subscales indicates moderate to severe loneliness in that area.

Reliability and Validity

The Differential Loneliness Scale – short student version (DLS-SSV) is a reliable and valid measure of loneliness in students. It has been used in a variety of research studies to investigate the factors that contribute to loneliness in students and the effects of loneliness on student well-being.

Reliability refers to the consistency of a measure. A reliable measure will produce consistent results over time and across different raters. The DLS-SSV has been shown to have good internal consistency, meaning that the items on the scale are all measuring the same construct. The total scale has an alpha coefficient of 0.90, which is considered to be excellent. The four subscales of the DLS-SSV also have good internal consistency, with alpha coefficients ranging from 0.70 to 0.80.

The DLS-SSV has also been shown to have good test-retest reliability, meaning that scores on the scale are consistent over time. In one study, participants took the DLS-SSV twice, one month apart, and their scores were highly correlated (r = 0.80).

Validity refers to the extent to which a measure measures what it is intended to measure. The DLS-SSV has been shown to have good construct validity, meaning that it correlates with other measures of loneliness, such as the UCLA Loneliness Scale and the Social Isolation Questionnaire. The DLS-SSV has also been shown to have good discriminant validity, meaning that it does not correlate strongly with other constructs, such as social anxiety and depression.

Available Versions

20-Items

Reference

Schmidt, N. & Sermat, V. (1983). Measuring loneliness in different relationships. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 44, 1038-1047.

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the DLS-SSV?
The DLS-SSV is a 20-item self-report scale that measures loneliness in four different areas: romantic/sexual relationships, friendships, family relationships, and relationships with the community.

Who developed the DLS-SSV?
The DLS-SSV was developed by Norbert Schmidt and Verena Sermat in 1983.

How is the DLS-SSV administered?
To administer the DLS-SSV, simply provide the scale to the student and ask them to read and follow the instructions. The student should indicate for each statement whether it is true or false as it applies to them. Items with an asterisk (*) are reverse-scored.

How is the DLS-SSV scored?
To score the DLS-SSV, simply add up the number of points for each item. The higher the total score, the higher the level of loneliness. A score of 10 or higher on any of the four subscales indicates moderate to severe loneliness in that area.

Is the DLS-SSV reliable and valid?
Yes, the DLS-SSV is a reliable and valid measure of loneliness in students. It has been used in a variety of research studies to investigate the factors that contribute to loneliness in students and the effects of loneliness on student well-being.

How can the DLS-SSV be used?
The DLS-SSV can be used to identify students who are experiencing loneliness in different areas of their lives, and to track changes in loneliness over time. It can also be used to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce loneliness in students.

What should I do if I am concerned that a student may be experiencing loneliness?
If you are concerned that a student may be experiencing loneliness, you can encourage them to talk to a school counselor or other trusted adult. You can also provide them with information about resources that are available to help them cope with loneliness.

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