Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children and Adolescents (DAAS)

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Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children and Adolescents (DAAS)

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About Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children and Adolescents (DAAS)

Scale Name

Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children and Adolescents (DAAS)

Author Details

L. A. Greco and Hart

Translation Availability

Not Sure

Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children and Adolescents (DAAS)
Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children and Adolescents (DAAS)

Background/Description

The Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children and Adolescents (DAAS) is a comprehensive psychometric tool developed by L. A. Greco and Hart in 2005 to assess the levels of psychological flexibility in youth diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. This scale, consisting of 42 items, was specifically designed to measure diabetes-specific acceptance and action among children and adolescents, providing valuable insights into how they manage their chronic health condition.

Living with Type 1 diabetes can present unique challenges for young individuals, requiring them to navigate a complex landscape of medical treatments, lifestyle adjustments, and emotional responses. The DAAS serves as a structured instrument to evaluate the psychological flexibility of these individuals in relation to their diabetes management. By assessing aspects such as acceptance, mindfulness, and willingness to engage in behaviors that align with their health goals, the scale offers a nuanced understanding of how young patients cope with the demands of their condition.

The development of the DAAS was rooted in the growing recognition of the importance of psychological factors in diabetes care. Research has shown that psychological flexibility plays a crucial role in how individuals adapt to chronic illnesses like Type 1 diabetes. By focusing on acceptance and action specifically related to diabetes management, the DAAS provides a targeted assessment tool that can inform interventions aimed at improving patient outcomes and quality of life.

The items included in the DAAS cover a range of domains relevant to diabetes acceptance and action. Participants are asked to rate statements that reflect their attitudes towards their condition, treatment adherence, emotional responses, and coping strategies. Through these responses, clinicians and researchers can gain valuable insights into the psychological processes at play in young individuals managing Type 1 diabetes.

Studies validating the DAAS have demonstrated its reliability and validity in assessing psychological flexibility in children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. The scale has shown good internal consistency and test-retest reliability, indicating its stability over time. Additionally, correlations with other measures of psychological well-being and diabetes management have supported its construct validity, further establishing its utility as a research and clinical tool.

In conclusion, the Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children and Adolescents (DAAS) represents a valuable contribution to the field of pediatric diabetes care. By focusing on psychological flexibility specific to diabetes management, this scale offers a nuanced understanding of how young individuals navigate the challenges of living with Type 1 diabetes. Its reliable and valid assessment capabilities make it a valuable resource for clinicians, researchers, and healthcare providers seeking to support the holistic well-being of children and adolescents with diabetes.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

  • Gather materials: You will need a copy of the DAAS questionnaire, a pen or pencil, and a quiet, private space where the child or adolescent can complete the questionnaire without distractions.
  • Review the questionnaire: Familiarize yourself with the DAAS questionnaire and scoring instructions beforehand. This will help you answer any questions the child or adolescent may have and ensure proper scoring.
  • Greet the child or adolescent and introduce yourself. Explain that you are going to ask them some questions about their thoughts and feelings about living with diabetes.
  • Obtain informed consent. If required by your institution or for research purposes, obtain informed consent from the child or adolescent and/or their parent or guardian.
  • Explain the purpose of the questionnaire. Briefly explain that the questionnaire is designed to help understand how they think and feel about their diabetes and how it affects their life.
  • Provide clear instructions. Instruct the child or adolescent to read each statement carefully and circle the number that best reflects their level of agreement with the statement.
  • Emphasize honesty and confidentiality. Assure the child or adolescent that there are no right or wrong answers and their responses will be kept confidential.
  • Answer any questions. Address any questions the child or adolescent may have about the questionnaire or the task.
  • Allow the child or adolescent to complete the questionnaire independently. Avoid providing any guidance or influencing their answers.
  • Be available for assistance. If the child or adolescent needs clarification on any item, re-read the statement for them but avoid interpreting or suggesting answers.

Reliability and Validity

The Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children and Adolescents (DAAS) has been shown to be a reliable and valid measure of diabetes-specific psychological flexibility in youth with Type 1 diabetes. Studies have demonstrated the scale’s good internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity. The DAAS has been found to have strong internal consistency (α = .86-.95) and good content validity based on associations with other measures, indicating its stability over time and its ability to accurately assess psychological flexibility related to diabetes management[5].

Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) has supported a one-factor structure of the Acceptance and Action Diabetes Questionnaire (AADQ) and a second-order DAAS solution with total values impairment and avoidance subscales. Bivariate correlations between all measures have further supported the content validity of the DAAS and its ability to measure diabetes-specific psychological flexibility effectively.

In conclusion, the Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children and Adolescents (DAAS) is a valuable tool for assessing psychological flexibility in young individuals with Type 1 diabetes. Its reliability, validity, and strong psychometric properties make it a useful instrument for clinicians, researchers, and healthcare providers seeking to understand and support the holistic well-being of children and adolescents living with diabetes.

Available Versions

42-Items

Reference

Greco, L. A. & Hart, T. A. (2005) The Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children
and Adolescents (DAAS).

Berlin, K. S., Keenan, M. E., Cook, J. L., Ankney, R. L., Klages, K. L., Semenkovich, K., Rybak, T. M., Banks, G. G., Alemzadeh, R., & Eddington, A. R. (2020). Measuring psychological flexibility in youth with type 1 diabetes. Pediatric diabetes21(8), 1566–1574. https://doi.org/10.1111/pedi.13110

Berlin, K. S., Keenan, M. E., Cook, J. L., Ankney, R. L., Klages, K. L., Semenkovich, K., … & Eddington, A. R. (2020). Measuring psychological flexibility in youth with type 1 diabetes. Pediatric Diabetes21(8), 1566-1574.

Gillanders, D. T., & Barker, E. (2019). Development and initial validation of a short form of the diabetes acceptance and Action Scale: The DAAS-Revised (DAAS-R). Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science14, 20-28.

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children and Adolescents (DAAS)?
The DAAS is a psychometric tool designed to assess diabetes-specific psychological flexibility in youth with Type 1 diabetes.

What is the purpose of the DAAS?
The purpose of the DAAS is to measure diabetes-related acceptance and action among children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes.

Who is the DAAS designed for?
The DAAS is designed for young individuals living with Type 1 diabetes.

How is the DAAS scored?
To score the DAAS, reverse score negatively worded items, then sum all items.

What do higher scores on the DAAS indicate?
Higher scores on the DAAS indicate higher levels of diabetes-related acceptance and action.

How long does it take to complete the DAAS?
The time to complete the DAAS may vary but typically takes around 15-20 minutes.

Is the DAAS a reliable measure?
Yes, the DAAS has shown good internal consistency and test-retest reliability.

Is the DAAS a valid measure?
The DAAS has demonstrated good construct validity in assessing psychological flexibility related to diabetes management.

What psychometric properties does the DAAS have?
The DAAS has strong internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and content validity.

What studies have been conducted on the DAAS?
Studies have supported its reliability, validity, and effectiveness in assessing psychological flexibility in youth with Type 1 diabetes.

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