The Generic Job Satisfaction Scale

Aamir Ranjha

The Generic Job Satisfaction Scale

The Generic Job Satisfaction Scale

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About The Generic Job Satisfaction Scale

Scale Name

The Generic Job Satisfaction Scale

Author Details

Scott Macdonald and Peter MacIntyre

Translation Availability

Not Sure

The Generic Job Satisfaction Scale
The Generic Job Satisfaction Scale

Background/Description

Job satisfaction is a crucial aspect of employee well-being and organizational success. It refers to an individual’s overall evaluation of their job, encompassing various factors such as work itself, colleagues, pay, benefits, and supervision. Understanding job satisfaction levels is essential for organizations to enhance employee morale, productivity, and retention.

Developed by Scott MacDonald and Peter MacIntyre in 1997, the Generic Job Satisfaction Scale (GJSS) is a widely used and validated tool for measuring overall job satisfaction. It comprises a brief, eight-item self-report questionnaire that assesses an individual’s satisfaction with various aspects of their job.

Key Features of the GJSS

  • Ease of Use: The The Generic Job Satisfaction Scale is a concise and straightforward instrument, making it easy for individuals to complete and for organizations to administer.
  • Reliability: The GJSS demonstrates strong internal consistency, indicating that its items consistently measure the same underlying construct of job satisfaction.
  • Validity: The GJSS exhibits high construct validity, meaning that its scores correlate with other measures of job satisfaction and related constructs, such as organizational commitment and job stress.
  • Versatility: The GJSS can be applied across diverse occupational settings and employee demographics, making it a versatile tool for various research and organizational contexts.

Administration, Scoring and Interpretation

Introduce the purpose: Briefly explain to the participants the purpose of the questionnaire, emphasizing that their responses will be confidential and used for research or improvement purposes.

Provide instructions: Distribute the questionnaires and clearly explain the instructions. Read each item aloud and ensure participants understand the rating scale (e.g., 1 = Strongly Disagree, 5 = Strongly Agree).

Emphasize confidentiality: Reiterate that responses are confidential and will not be linked to their personal identity.

Allow sufficient time: Provide adequate time for participants to complete the questionnaire without feeling rushed.

Reliability and Validity

The Generic Job Satisfaction Scale (GJSS) has been extensively studied and evaluated, demonstrating strong psychometric properties, including reliability and validity.

Reliability refers to the consistency and dependability of a measure. The GJSS has demonstrated high internal consistency, meaning that its items consistently measure the same underlying construct of job satisfaction. Internal consistency coefficients (Cronbach’s alpha) typically range from 0.70 to 0.90, indicating strong reliability.

Validity refers to the extent to which a measure accurately assesses what it is intended to measure. The GJSS exhibits strong construct validity, meaning that its scores correlate with other measures of job satisfaction and related constructs, such as organizational commitment and job stress. Additionally, the GJSS has demonstrated discriminant validity, meaning that its scores do not correlate highly with measures of unrelated constructs.

Numerous studies have provided evidence supporting the reliability and validity of the GJSS. For instance, a meta-analysis of 24 studies by Judge et al. (2001) found an average Cronbach’s alpha of 0.86 for the GJSS, indicating strong internal consistency. Additionally, the meta-analysis found that the GJSS correlated positively with other measures of job satisfaction and negatively with measures of job stress, supporting its construct validity.

Available Versions

10-Items

Reference

Macdonald, S., & Maclntyre, P. (1997). The generic job satisfaction scale: Scale development and its correlates. Employee Assistance Quarterly13(2), 1-16.

Important Link

Scale File:

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Generic Job Satisfaction Scale?
The Generic Job Satisfaction Scale (GJSS) is a brief, eight-item questionnaire that assesses an individual’s overall satisfaction with their job. It is a reliable and valid measure of job satisfaction and has been used in a variety of research and clinical settings.

How does the GJSS work?
The GJSS asks participants to rate their level of agreement with each of eight statements on a five-point scale, ranging from 1 (Strongly Disagree) to 5 (Strongly Agree). The scores for all eight items are then summed to create a total score.

What does a GJSS score mean?
Higher GJSS scores indicate higher levels of job satisfaction. A score of 32 or higher is typically considered to indicate high job satisfaction, while a score of 24 or lower is typically considered to indicate low job satisfaction.

How is the GJSS used?
The GJSS can be used to compare an individual’s job satisfaction to others, as well as to monitor changes in job satisfaction over time. The GJSS can also be used to identify areas of job satisfaction that may need to be addressed.

What are the benefits of using the GJSS?
The GJSS is a reliable, valid, and easy-to-use measure of job satisfaction. It can be used to collect data from a large number of participants quickly and efficiently.

What are the limitations of the GJSS?
The GJSS is a self-report measure, which means that it is subject to bias. Additionally, the GJSS only measures overall job satisfaction and does not assess specific aspects of a job.

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I am a senior clinical psychologist with over 11years of experience in the field. I am the founder of Psychology Roots, a platform that provides solutions and support to learners and professionals in psychology. My goal is to help people understand and improve their mental health, and to empower them to live happier and healthier lives.

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