Clinical Assessment & Research Resource Centre (CARRC)

Clinical Assessment & Research Resource Centre (CARRC)

According to WHO report on Burden of disease worldwide (2003), approximately 450 million people are having a mental disorder which contributes 33% to disability adjusted life years. Neuropsychiatric disorders are among the top six causes of disability globally (such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, schizophrenia, bipolar disorders). Pakistan is a low middle income country who have a mental health policy, and plan to adapt biopsychosocial approach in primary health care system but implementation on mental health policy is absent due to lack of political will power, and absence of research on previous mental health program evaluation, and lack of epidemiological studies on prevalence of mental disorders in Pakistan at national level (Irfan, 2010).

World Health Organization (WHO, 2009) has assessed Pakistan’s mental health facilities and systems in 2009 which identified that there is very limited number of health professional and hospitals in Pakistan such as 342 psychiatrist, 13643 nurses, 478 psychologists, and 3145 social workers for per 100,000 populations in country. Most of these services are in urban areas, while the most population of Pakistan lives in rural areas (68%), where mental health facilities are not available (WHO AIMS report Pak, 2009). Our country comes in low middle income countries, and our economic currency worth in exchange market is very low which further create inflation, and unemployment. These socio-cultural factors create frustration, aggression, depression, and anxiety in society which is manifested in form of domestic violence, child abuse, violence against women, and extremism. According to WHO (2003) poverty, low education, violence, trauma interactively produce a vicious cycle of vulnerability for having a mental illness which implies that Pakistani communities are vulnerable places whose individual are more likely to have mental illness due to repeated vicious interaction among poverty, unemployment, violence, trauma in our country.

Another important issues to mention here is the inconsiderate efforts of government toward handling the stigma attached to mental health service utility. In Pakistan most of the people do not like to receive services because they are afraid of being stigmatized by rest of their life as insane or mental by community. Also, there is a lack of awareness in public about what is mental health and from where they can get help to improve their wellbeing. These factors might have promoted believe in superstitious thinking and seeking help from faith healers rather than from a psychologist. Apart from these, inadequate training, and incompetent, unethical malpractice of psychologist and psychiatrist have further drowned the name and credibility of mental health professionals.

In short, Pakistan lacks financial resources and have very minor budget for its education annually, and it has been in trouble mostly for corruption, lack of resources and unmet needs of young population for learning, and growth. Clinical psychology is a small child in Pakistan which is in process of still developing. There are less job opportunities than number of psychology graduates produced by universities each year. One of the reasons of unemployed psychologist is seen to be lack of quality education, and quality professional skill development opportunities for clinical psychologist in Pakistan. There are very few organizations that only build capacity of their own employees and are in scarcity. Any student who belongs to a lower socio-economic status, or underprivileged remote areas of Pakistan cannot get opportunity to enhance his/her clinical assessment, psycho-diagnostic, and research skills due to lack of resources and due to lack of any online platform that can provide ‘feasible, and affordable’ quality services for professional growth and development of career for students of clinical psychology.

In backdrop of all these problem and issues, Psychology roots has taken an initiative to help students, beginners’ psychologist of remote areas in their quest for having a unmet need of training and career growth in field of clinical psychology. CARRC is a clinical assessment & research resource center, an initiative of psychology roots to enhance the assessment, psycho-diagnosis, and research skills of students, beginner psychologist, professionals in field of clinical psychology.

Aim & Objectives of CARRC

In backdrop of all these problem and issues, Psychology roots has taken an initiative to help students, beginners’ psychologist of remote areas in their quest for having a unmet need of training and career growth in field of clinical psychology. CARRC is a clinical assessment & research resource center, an initiative of psychology roots to enhance the assessment, psycho-diagnosis, and research skills of students, beginner psychologist, professionals in field of clinical psychology.

In lieu of these unmet needs of underprivileged students, beginner psychologist, CARRC aims to fill this gap by providing its services with these objectives:

1)To enhance the assessment and psychodiagnostics skills of students and professionals.

2) facilitation in learning formal and informal assessment tools.

3) providing platform for continuous professional growth for clinical psychologists

4)  Bridging the gap in professional training through live interactive supervision sessions, case conferences, symposium

What We Offer

  • Training
  • Courses
  • Supervision Meetings
  • Clinical case studies
  • Clinical Test based Report Writing
  • Test Description, Administration Scoring Procedure, Interpretation, and Report
  • Treatment
  • Case Presentation

Psychology Roots Resources

CARRC

Coming Soon

CARRC Training
In this Training, we provide complete insight about Psychological Test including introduction, adminstration, Assessment, and Report writing.
Book Now your Training

CARRC Courses

Our Courses Registration is scheduled, In one session only 20 seats available. Come first to reserve your seat.
  • Session 1 Registration open from Jan 1 to 30 Jan every year.
  • Session 2 Registration open from June 1 to 30 June every year.

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Psychology Roots

Firdous Afzal

Clinical Psychologist (CARRC Head)
Psychology Roots

M. Aamir Ranjha

Clinical Psychologist (Workgroup Supervisor)

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